Rejection hurts, but these tips will help you bounce back better than ever

Experiencing rejection in your work life is inevitable—but it can be devastating when not processed productively. So what are the best ways to handle rejection and move forward? Here you’ll find 5 productive ways to respond to rejection.

It’s not you, it’s not them, it’s you two together: Organizational psychologist Adam Grant wrote in the New York Times that you should not blame yourself or the employer. Rather, you must consider that the two of you together did not work. “New research reveals that when people are in the habit of blaming setbacks on relationships instead of only on the individuals involved, they’re less likely to give up — and more motivated to get better.”

Check-in with yourself: Time magazine writes that if passed over for a job or a promotion, check-in with yourself and see if the job you’re in and aspiring to can fulfill those needs. If not, perhaps it’s time to consider a change.

Revive your self-esteem: O magazine recommends in the aftermath of a rejection to write a list of strengths to replenish self-esteem. By reminding ourselves on a deeper level that we are valuable, we can gather the confidence to get back out there after rejection.

Learn from it: Psychology Today writes that mentally strong people attempt to learn from their rejection and see it from a productive, educational mindset.

Wear people down with perseverance: In an interview with The Rumpus, writer Elizabeth Gilbert discussed how she always believed she could write, and how that is how she developed such a confident voice. She went on to say she’s always surprised by people who feel they don’t have a right to do their work, or that they need a permission slip to do their work.

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Rejection hurts, but these tips will help you bounce back better than ever

Experiencing rejection in your work life is inevitable—but it can be devastating when not processed productively. So what are the best ways to handle rejection and move forward? Here you’ll find 5 productive ways to respond to rejection.

It’s not you, it’s not them, it’s you two together: Organizational psychologist Adam Grant wrote in the New York Times that you should not blame yourself or the employer. Rather, you must consider that the two of you together did not work. “New research reveals that when people are in the habit of blaming setbacks on relationships instead of only on the individuals involved, they’re less likely to give up — and more motivated to get better.”

Check-in with yourself: Time magazine writes that if passed over for a job or a promotion, check-in with yourself and see if the job you’re in and aspiring to can fulfill those needs. If not, perhaps it’s time to consider a change.

Revive your self-esteem: O magazine recommends in the aftermath of a rejection to write a list of strengths to replenish self-esteem. By reminding ourselves on a deeper level that we are valuable, we can gather the confidence to get back out there after rejection.

Learn from it: Psychology Today writes that mentally strong people attempt to learn from their rejection and see it from a productive, educational mindset.

Wear people down with perseverance: In an interview with The Rumpus, writer Elizabeth Gilbert discussed how she always believed she could write, and how that is how she developed such a confident voice. She went on to say she’s always surprised by people who feel they don’t have a right to do their work, or that they need a permission slip to do their work.

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