Energy:

Stanford scientists have figured out a way to turn seawater into hydrogen fuel

Harnessing the power of waves isn’t the only way to generate energy from the ocean. As it turns out, a team of scientists at Stanford have figured out a way to make hydrogen fuel out of saltwater.  The discovery could open up the world's oceans as a potential source of energy. Researchers view electrolysis, or the act of splitting water into hydrogen and gas, as a promising new source of renewable energy. But it comes with many roadblocks; a major one being that only purified water can be used in electrolysis. Seawater tends to corrode water-splitting systems. Unfortunately, purified water is in itself…

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  • Engadget
  • Date:03/20/2019

Kansas City sets bold target to make government 100 percent carbon-free by 2020

Kansas City aka “The Heart of America” has voted unanimously to transition all its municipal electricity to carbon-free sources by the end of 2020. Kansas City was among the first US cities to declare its support for the goals of the Paris Agreement and has been putting that support into practice over the last few years. Last year, the city announced it had reduced its municipal greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent below the year 2000 levels, surpassing its goal of a 30 percent reduction by 2020. The city has also set goals to transition away from both coal and…

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  • NextCity
  • Date:03/20/2019

Wales takes on challenge of delivering 100 percent renewable energy by 2035

Policy experts in Wales have set out a new ambitious energy plan that could put the country on the track of achieving 100 percent electricity from renewable sources by 2035. The transition process is expected to create over 20,000 new jobs and deliver a $10 billion economic boost for the country’s economy. Specifically, the plan proposes power efficiency upgrades for 870,000 homes and the rollout of 11GW of renewable energy capacity. On top of that, the plan calls for a number of policy interventions to unlock further renewables investment like ensuring more public land is being used for renewable energy…

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  • Business Green
  • Date:03/20/2019

Wind energy alone provided half of Germany's power last week

With Germany getting set to give coal the boot by 2038, its renewables are proving to be more than capable of mitigating the country’s dependence on fossil fuels. Just last week, thanks to strong gusts, wind energy provided half of the country's energy. Together with solar panels and other clean energy sources, a total of 64.8 percent of the country's net power production between March 4 and 10 came from renewables. According to researchers, coal-fired power plants only ran at minimum output during that week, while nuclear plants were curtailed during the night. Such achievements show that Europe’s biggest economy might…

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  • Clean Energy Wire
  • Date:03/15/2019

Finland to phase out coal completely within the next decade

Finland pledged to eliminate its reliance on coal by 2030, but now the Nordic country has changed its mind. Instead, the Finnish government has pushed through a motion to complete the coal ban a year earlier. Now we know what you’re thinking: just one year? What’s the big deal? While it may not seem like much, the move means the country will be completely coal-free within the next decade and will have to increase its phasing out program by around 10 percent to meet the goal. If Finland needs some inspiration to reach its ambitious targets even quicker, all they…

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  • Inhabitat
  • Date:03/14/2019

New Mexico becomes latest state to officially commit to 100 percent renewables

The Land of Enchantment, New Mexico, has just passed a bill that requires its public utilities to embrace 100 percent clean energy by 2045, making it the third state to officially commit to carbon-free electricity. Following in the footsteps of California and Hawaii, New Mexico will oust coal and invest heavily into solar energy. The bill also imposes interim renewable energy targets of 50 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2040. To compensate for the loss of coal revenue, the new legislation requires $40 million to be sent to regions expected to lose coal production while also building 450 MW…

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  • Quartz
  • Date:03/14/2019

California has already surpassed its 2020 renewable energy target

When a state or company creates ambitious climate action targets for itself, it’s commendable. But only when those targets are actually achieved can those entities be recognized and respected. A few years back, California set a goal of having 33 percent of the state’s retail electricity come from renewable sources by 2020. According to the California Energy Commission, the Golden State already surpassed that goal in 2018 as more than 34 percent of electricity is coming from clean sources. This means California is well underway in achieving its goal of 50 percent renewable by 2026.

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  • PlanetARK
  • Date:03/12/2019

Poop-to-power projects provide sanitation solutions to the developing world

Most people don’t give a second thought to the poop they flush away. But perhaps they should, because the energy contained within our repellent remains is impressive. If you let poop fester—and you probably shouldn’t in polite company—bacterial digestion will produce a methane-rich ‘biogas’ that can be harnessed for energy. You can also dehydrate a deuce to make powdery fuel or combustible bricks with a similar energy content to coal. These schemes may sound outlandish, but wastewater plants all over the developed world take advantage of this salvageable energy to subsidize their operations. One UK-based treatment plant, for example, gets…

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  • Earther
  • Date:03/11/2019

Geothermal energy used to be limited to places near volcanoes. Not anymore

Geothermal power is the best of both worlds. It is flexible, like natural-gas power, providing energy whenever needed. And it’s green, like wind and solar power, producing almost no emissions. So, why isn’t everyone using geothermal energy if it’s so good? Places like Iceland and Indonesia can enjoy large amounts of geothermal energy because they have access to extremely hot water near volcanoes, but others like France of the UK don’t have the same luxury. That could soon change though thanks to Climeon, a Swedish company that has come up with a technology that can make use of low-temperature heat,…

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  • Quartz
  • Date:03/07/2019

By 2035, Atlanta will power all its buildings with clean energy

Atlanta is known for many wonderful things, but sustainability is not one of them. In fact, the city currently gets less than 10 percent of its energy from “clean” sources while ranking fourth-worst in the country when it comes to energy affordability. For a city that gets as much sunlight as Atlanta, this makes little sense. The city council seems to agree, which is why they’ve voted unanimously to ensure all buildings in the city—homes, businesses, and city-owned structures—run on renewable energy by 2035. The Mayor’s Office of Resilience, which developed the plan, estimates hitting its goals will reduce residents’…

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  • Grist
  • Date:03/07/2019
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