Health:

Cannabis compound THC may improve memory in Alzheimer’s

Researchers say THC can impair or improve memory depending on age and disease. Findings suggest, in Alzheimer’s disease, the cannabis compound can help improve memory and mitigate some of the symptoms of the disease.

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  • Date:11/16/2018

Research: probiotics increase bone volume

A widely-used probiotic stimulates bone formation in young female mice, according to a study published November 13th in the journal Immunity. In response to treatment with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), other intestinal microbes produced a metabolite called butyrate, which in turn activated bone-enhancing immune cells, including regulatory T cells.

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  • Date:11/15/2018

New exercise guidelines: move more, sit less, start younger

Move more, sit less and get kids active as young as age 3, say new federal guidelines that stress that any amount and any type of exercise helps health. The advice is the first update since the government’s physical activity guidelines came out a decade ago.

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  • Date:11/15/2018

Coconut oil is better than the common repellent at keeping mosquitos away

Researchers have found another benefit of coconut oil: the oil performs better at protecting against malaria-carrying mosquitos than the active chemical ingredient in most insect repellents. Not only is the oil healthier, but it can also provide protection for up to two weeks while working against other blood-sucking insects such as flies, ticks, and bedbugs.

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  • What Doctors Don't Tell You
  • Date:11/14/2018

Using social media may only worsen your feelings of depression and loneliness

If you’re feeling depressed or lonely, browsing social media may be the last thing you should be doing. According to a new study, researchers found that cutting down on social media usage actually improved the well-being of people suffering from depression. Simply by cutting social media usage to under 30 minutes per day, participants in the study reported decreases in feelings associated with depression and loneliness.

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  • Quartz
  • Date:11/13/2018

Being a coffee addict may actually be a good thing

People who start their day off with a cup of coffee may actually benefit considerably from having it daily. A new study shows that drinking coffee may lower your risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, and actually boost your thinking skills. Surprisingly enough, it’s not caffeine that provides these brain-protecting benefits but rather the compounds released during the process of roasting the coffee beans.

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  • MedicalNewsToday
  • Date:11/08/2018

New science suggests there's a really fishy way to fight asthma in kids

Around the globe, asthma is the most common respiratory illness among young people, and many can’t access or afford the medication needed to keep symptoms at bay. New research out of Australia suggests there may be an alternative way to reduce suffering from the illness.

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  • Date:11/07/2018

Spice up your meals with this tasty healing aid

One of the main components that gives a curry dish its distinctive flavor is turmeric. Its tanginess, however, isn’t the only quality that gives this spice its reputation. For centuries, people have used it for its anti-inflammatory and disease-preventing properties. To reap the health benefits of turmeric, have a look here.

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  • Pop Sugar
  • Date:11/02/2018

Novel research finds mechanism that induces self-destruction in cancer cells

What was originally a study focused on finding the natural mechanisms that could protect organisms from cancer has led to a stunning finding: the researchers have discovered that inside every cell within the human body is a toxic code designed to trigger self-destruction if it senses a cell is turning cancerous. Now that the researchers have decoded the exact mechanism that can destroy cancer cells, the hope is that it can lead to entirely novel kind of cancer treatment.

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  • New Atlas
  • Date:11/02/2018

Study suggests that dying from a broken heart may actually be a thing

A new study has found that the feeling of grief can promote inflammation, which can have detrimental effects on people’s health. The researchers interviewed and took blood samples of 100 people who recently lost their spouses. Those in the top one-third of people who experienced exalted grief indicated levels of inflammation 54 percent higher than the one-third at the bottom. This study follows other research that suggested grieving people being are at a considerably higher risk of major depression, heart attack, stroke, and premature mortality.

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  • Date:11/01/2018
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