How to choose a neurofeedback practitioner

Blaine Greteman | March 2009 issue

Neurofeedback remains unregulated in most countries. So how can you choose a skilled practitioner? James R. Evans, who wrote and edited some of the leading neurofeedback training guidebooks, recommends looking for a therapist certified by a group like the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America. “Most insurance companies, for one thing, are going to require that,” he points out. But as Martin Wuttke—who helped form the Professional Association for Integrated Neurofeedback Training to certify practitioners in the Netherlands—notes, “It’s really not even as simple as that, because there are plenty of people certified by various bodies who may or may not have the best techniques or motives.” If you want a glimpse of the technique at work, check out the website of Wild Divine, a company that combines biofeedback hardware with guided meditation training to enhance wellness.
Ultimately—and perhaps appropriately for a technology lauded for unlocking a patient’s own potential—Wuttke emphasizes that prospective patients should do the research to make sure a therapist is right for them. Check out his track record by asking for references, looking at her educational and publication history or talking to other people in your community. A typical neurofeedback session will set you back $50 to $120; a complete course of treatment often requires 30 or 40 sessions. Finally, after you’ve done all you can to make yourself comfortable with your neurotherapist, take comfort in the fact that the procedure itself is non-invasive. “Luckily, there seem to be few lasting side effects, except for ones that help,” says Evans.

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How to choose a neurofeedback practitioner

Blaine Greteman | March 2009 issue

Neurofeedback remains unregulated in most countries. So how can you choose a skilled practitioner? James R. Evans, who wrote and edited some of the leading neurofeedback training guidebooks, recommends looking for a therapist certified by a group like the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America. “Most insurance companies, for one thing, are going to require that,” he points out. But as Martin Wuttke—who helped form the Professional Association for Integrated Neurofeedback Training to certify practitioners in the Netherlands—notes, “It’s really not even as simple as that, because there are plenty of people certified by various bodies who may or may not have the best techniques or motives.” If you want a glimpse of the technique at work, check out the website of Wild Divine, a company that combines biofeedback hardware with guided meditation training to enhance wellness.
Ultimately—and perhaps appropriately for a technology lauded for unlocking a patient’s own potential—Wuttke emphasizes that prospective patients should do the research to make sure a therapist is right for them. Check out his track record by asking for references, looking at her educational and publication history or talking to other people in your community. A typical neurofeedback session will set you back $50 to $120; a complete course of treatment often requires 30 or 40 sessions. Finally, after you’ve done all you can to make yourself comfortable with your neurotherapist, take comfort in the fact that the procedure itself is non-invasive. “Luckily, there seem to be few lasting side effects, except for ones that help,” says Evans.

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