Water-strapped communities could thrive by creating their own “water microgrids”

Every year, 600,000 vacationers flock to the tiny island of Sandhamn off the coast of Sweden. With only 90 full-time residents, the island’s water systems are put under unbearable strain when tourists pour onto the island. Through a partnership with water technology company Bluewater, though, that’s changing. Bluewater extracts water from the Baltic Sea, runs it through a network of purifiers, and produces up to 30,000 liters of drinking water per day. The “reject water” leftover from the purification is then used for other purposes like toilet flushing. For other communities struggling with access to clean water, Bluewater’s system could be the solution.

Solution News Source

Water-strapped communities could thrive by creating their own “water microgrids”

Every year, 600,000 vacationers flock to the tiny island of Sandhamn off the coast of Sweden. With only 90 full-time residents, the island’s water systems are put under unbearable strain when tourists pour onto the island. Through a partnership with water technology company Bluewater, though, that’s changing. Bluewater extracts water from the Baltic Sea, runs it through a network of purifiers, and produces up to 30,000 liters of drinking water per day. The “reject water” leftover from the purification is then used for other purposes like toilet flushing. For other communities struggling with access to clean water, Bluewater’s system could be the solution.

Solution News Source

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