Today’s Solutions: March 03, 2024

When does a school science project become especially worthy of attention? When it actually makes an impact outside the school. At West Leyden High School, just outside Chicago, some students are part of a science program called e-NABLE that teaches students how to use engineering software and 3D printers to create prosthetics. 

Since the program started in 2013, Leyden students have made about 75 prosthetic hands for kids in the U.S. and in countries like Syria and India. Prosthetic limbs usually cost anywhere from $3,000 to tens of thousands of dollars, while those provided through the program are free. 

For the students, the project goes beyond learning to use software to create prosthetics—it also involves connecting with recipients of the prosthetics. For instance, Leyden students have been video-chatting with a boy in Syria who’d lost his hand due to war-related violence and have watched him test out his new 3D-printed version. The project goes to show what can happen when education meets purpose.

Solutions News Source Print this article
More of Today's Solutions

This is your brain on music

Music does something to humans like no other animal. The rhythm gets inside our bodies and we can’t help but move along with the ...

Read More

Recruiting kombucha in the fight for sustainable drinking water

We’ve previously reported about the use of kombucha for a number of innovative reasons. Like stylish compostable shoes, sustainable wood alternatives, and as the ...

Read More

How a group of islanders is using AI to save coral reefs

Coral reefs are some of the planet’s most biodiverse ecosystems, providing not only a key habitat for many species of marine life but also ...

Read More

Opting out: 4 alternative movements to redefine Black Friday

Right now, the Black Friday shopping festivities are undoubtedly engulfing our screens and storefronts. It's easy for consumerism to take center stage, but nonetheless, ...

Read More