Wild tiger populations around the world are making a comeback

Millions watched them in captivity on the lockdown TV hit Tiger King, but in the wild, tiger populations have been in rapid decline for decades.

There is some positive news though. According to new figures from the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), the number of wild tigers in some parts of the world is on the rise.

Only a decade ago, wild populations of the big cat were at a historic low of 3,200 animals. But now five countries – India, Nepal, Russian, China, and Bhutan – have given hope for the future.

Nepal has seen its population of tigers rise from 121 in 2009 to 235 just under a decade later. And it’s the same story in Russia, Bhutan, and China, where increased sightings of tigers suggest conservation efforts are working.

And while this is good news, experts warn that the endangered species still faces major threats such as poaching, hunting, and habitat loss due to deforestation. This is where individual action can help. People can consult the labels on the products they buy and avoid purchasing items, like wood and paper, that may have resulted from illegal logging.

Solution News Source

Wild tiger populations around the world are making a comeback

Millions watched them in captivity on the lockdown TV hit Tiger King, but in the wild, tiger populations have been in rapid decline for decades.

There is some positive news though. According to new figures from the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), the number of wild tigers in some parts of the world is on the rise.

Only a decade ago, wild populations of the big cat were at a historic low of 3,200 animals. But now five countries – India, Nepal, Russian, China, and Bhutan – have given hope for the future.

Nepal has seen its population of tigers rise from 121 in 2009 to 235 just under a decade later. And it’s the same story in Russia, Bhutan, and China, where increased sightings of tigers suggest conservation efforts are working.

And while this is good news, experts warn that the endangered species still faces major threats such as poaching, hunting, and habitat loss due to deforestation. This is where individual action can help. People can consult the labels on the products they buy and avoid purchasing items, like wood and paper, that may have resulted from illegal logging.

Solution News Source

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