Detached, but not indifferent

Thoughts on the Warrior of Light and renunciation.

Paulo Coelho | April 2009 issue

In any activity, we have to know what to expect, how to reach our objectives and what capacity we possess for the proposed task. The only people who can say they have renounced the fruit are those who, thus equipped, feel no desire for the results of the conquest, and remain absorbed in combat. You can renounce the fruit, but this renunciation does not mean indifference toward the result. This strategy belongs to Mahatma Gandhi. The Warrior of Light listens with respect and is not confused by people who are incapable of reaching any result and always preach renunciation.

Renouncing vengeance

The Warrior of Light holds the sword, deciding what to do and not do in any circumstances. There are moments when life leads to a crisis and we are forced to divorce ourselves from things we have always loved.
Then the Warrior reflects, assessing whether she or he is fulfilling God’s will or acting through egoism. If separation is the path, that is accepted without complaint.
However, if this separation is provoked by the perversity of others, then he or she is implacable in answering. The Warrior possesses the art of the blow and the art of pardon and knows how to use both with equal skill.

Renouncing provocation

Experienced fighters endure insults; they know the strength of their fists and the efficacy of their blows. In front of the ill-prepared opponent, they merely contemplate and show strength through their looks. They win without needing to take the fight to the physical level.
As the Warrior of Light learns from spiritual masters, the light of faith shines in his or her eyes and there is no need to prove anything to anyone. The aggressive arguments presented by the opponent—that God is superstition, that miracles are tricks, that believing in angels is fleeing from reality—are of no importance.
Like the fighter, the Warrior of Light is aware of his or her immense strength, and will never fight with anyone who does not deserve the honor of combat.

Renouncing time

The Warrior of Light listens to Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu when he says that we must detach ourselves from the idea of days and hours and pay more and more attention to the minutes. Only in this way will we manage to resolve certain problems before they happen. By paying close attention to the small things, we learn to protect ourselves from the calamities.
But to think about the small things does not mean to think small. The Warrior knows a great dream is made of many things, in the same way that the light of the sun is the sum of its millions of beams.

Renouncing comfort

The Warrior of Light contemplates the two columns beside the door to be opened. One is called Fear, the other Desire.
The Warrior looks at the column of Fear and reads, “You are about to enter an unknown and dangerous world where all you have learned up until now will be of no use whatsoever.”
The Warrior of Light looks at the column of Desire and reads, “You are about to leave a known world where all the things you always wanted and all that you have fought so hard for are kept.”
The Warrior smiles, because nothing can frighten or hold him or her. With the confidence of those who know what they want, the Warrior opens the door.
Paulo Coelho is the Brazilian author
of international bestsellers, including The Alchemist. paulocoelhoblog.com

Solution News Source

Detached, but not indifferent

Thoughts on the Warrior of Light and renunciation.

Paulo Coelho | April 2009 issue

In any activity, we have to know what to expect, how to reach our objectives and what capacity we possess for the proposed task. The only people who can say they have renounced the fruit are those who, thus equipped, feel no desire for the results of the conquest, and remain absorbed in combat. You can renounce the fruit, but this renunciation does not mean indifference toward the result. This strategy belongs to Mahatma Gandhi. The Warrior of Light listens with respect and is not confused by people who are incapable of reaching any result and always preach renunciation.

Renouncing vengeance

The Warrior of Light holds the sword, deciding what to do and not do in any circumstances. There are moments when life leads to a crisis and we are forced to divorce ourselves from things we have always loved.
Then the Warrior reflects, assessing whether she or he is fulfilling God’s will or acting through egoism. If separation is the path, that is accepted without complaint.
However, if this separation is provoked by the perversity of others, then he or she is implacable in answering. The Warrior possesses the art of the blow and the art of pardon and knows how to use both with equal skill.

Renouncing provocation

Experienced fighters endure insults; they know the strength of their fists and the efficacy of their blows. In front of the ill-prepared opponent, they merely contemplate and show strength through their looks. They win without needing to take the fight to the physical level.
As the Warrior of Light learns from spiritual masters, the light of faith shines in his or her eyes and there is no need to prove anything to anyone. The aggressive arguments presented by the opponent—that God is superstition, that miracles are tricks, that believing in angels is fleeing from reality—are of no importance.
Like the fighter, the Warrior of Light is aware of his or her immense strength, and will never fight with anyone who does not deserve the honor of combat.

Renouncing time

The Warrior of Light listens to Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu when he says that we must detach ourselves from the idea of days and hours and pay more and more attention to the minutes. Only in this way will we manage to resolve certain problems before they happen. By paying close attention to the small things, we learn to protect ourselves from the calamities.
But to think about the small things does not mean to think small. The Warrior knows a great dream is made of many things, in the same way that the light of the sun is the sum of its millions of beams.

Renouncing comfort

The Warrior of Light contemplates the two columns beside the door to be opened. One is called Fear, the other Desire.
The Warrior looks at the column of Fear and reads, “You are about to enter an unknown and dangerous world where all you have learned up until now will be of no use whatsoever.”
The Warrior of Light looks at the column of Desire and reads, “You are about to leave a known world where all the things you always wanted and all that you have fought so hard for are kept.”
The Warrior smiles, because nothing can frighten or hold him or her. With the confidence of those who know what they want, the Warrior opens the door.
Paulo Coelho is the Brazilian author
of international bestsellers, including The Alchemist. paulocoelhoblog.com

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