A key to light

If it weren’t for the sun—that is, light—we wouldn’t exist. Light is the essence of life. We eat it, in converted form; plants absorb light and use it to produce fruit. Indian Ayurvedic medicine centers on prana—life energy—which, the tradition holds, consists primarily of light. The Chinese call this energy qi or chi, and it’s fundamental to acupuncture theory. Modern research has found that acupuncture points near the eyes act as windows, allowing light into the body.
If light is fundamental to life, then it would seem obvious that a lack or disruption of it could make you sick. An obvious example is seasonal affective disorder, which is treated with light therapy. Biophoton medicine is based on this principle. Making that health-giving light treatment available to anyone is the premise that led to a simple, revolutionary instrument developed for in-home use by Johan Boswinkel, a pioneer in the field for 30 years.
German physicist Fritz-Albert Popp, who reinvented the way we think about biophotons, demonstrated that every cell in the body emitted an extremely faint light. He showed that these particles, or biophotons, direct the body’s biochemical processes. And Popp found that each cell gave off either a coherent, “healthy” light or a chaotic type, which indicated the presence of disease. The explanation is simple: If biophotons guide our biochemical processes in a disorderly fashion, there will be disruption, and we’ll experience that disruption as illness.
Inspired by this work, in the 1980s Johan Boswinkel developed an instrument that combined Popp’s findings with the principles of electro-acupuncture.
Electro-acupuncture is based on the electromagnetic current at acupuncture points—each of which is linked to a particular organ or gland—which clearly deviates from that of the surrounding skin.
Measurements taken with Boswinkel’s original instrument, the Chiren, yielded two results: The machine showed either a straight line, representing a powerful, consistent current at the point of measurement, or a hyperbola, indicating an ebbing current and hence a weakness at the acupuncture point—and in its associated organ.
Treatment consists of correcting disrupted light frequencies. The patient holds two glass electrodes, one of which absorbs the “polluted” light emitted by the body. The instrument “purifies” the light’s frequency and returns it to the body via the other electrode. This purification involves the potency principles of homeopathy, which is also based on frequencies. The patient is treated with his or her own light (for an extensive report on Boswinkel’s work, see the July/August 2011 issue of Ode).
Over the past few decades, Boswinkel has treated thousands of people, with remarkable results. He claims an 80 percent success rate and points out that his patients are usually chronic cases who have already exhausted the usual medical options. His success is driving a fast-growing demand
for biophoton therapy. Though Boswinkel has trained hundreds of therapists worldwide, there’s still a big gap between supply and demand.
Thus, he’s spent years looking for a simple do-it-yourself solution that would enable people to benefit from biophoton medicine without having to visit a therapist. He recently found it, introducing a simplified version of his therapeutic measuring and treatment tool. The Chikey, or “light key,” can’t measure frequency disruptions, but Boswinkel says its five basic programs can remedy 70 percent of ailments and symptoms. “I plan to use the Chikey in areas with few or no therapists,” Boswinkel says.
A therapist can perform an initial treatment at his or her practice and then prescribe follow-up treatments, which can be loaded onto the Chikey and administered by the patient at home. The instrument can be used preventively, too. Boswinkel says weekly treatments can support the body’s self-healing ability and significantly reduce the chance of serious problems developing.
The battery-powered, travel-friendly Chikey also contains a biofeedback system that allows direct observation of a treatment’s effect on the body. The instrument is safe; the only “active ingredient” is the body’s own light. “People need to realize what biophotons—their own light—can do for their health,” Boswinkel says.
The Chikey has another surprising application. Not only is light essential for the human body, it’s also the main building block of plants. But a plant’s light loses power if the plant is out of contact with its roots for too long. A head of lettuce that has spent a few days on a store shelf doesn’t just lose its freshness but its energy too. Put it in a bowl of water and give it two minutes with the Chikey, though, and its light will be restored.
As if that didn’t sound mysterious enough, the instrument can even be used to mellow and deepen the taste of wine. “This is a simple way to make wine years older and better in minutes,” Boswinkel says, hinting at a gap in the market. Similarly, the Chikey makes it easy to remove chlorine from drinking water, so it could come in handy for travelers. Biophoton treatment offers a simple, cheap and effective answer to a host of bothersome conditions and chronic symptoms. Now Johan Boswinkel has brought it within reach of the masses with a genuine “key to light.”
Photo: Pieter De Swart

Solution News Source

A key to light

If it weren’t for the sun—that is, light—we wouldn’t exist. Light is the essence of life. We eat it, in converted form; plants absorb light and use it to produce fruit. Indian Ayurvedic medicine centers on prana—life energy—which, the tradition holds, consists primarily of light. The Chinese call this energy qi or chi, and it’s fundamental to acupuncture theory. Modern research has found that acupuncture points near the eyes act as windows, allowing light into the body.
If light is fundamental to life, then it would seem obvious that a lack or disruption of it could make you sick. An obvious example is seasonal affective disorder, which is treated with light therapy. Biophoton medicine is based on this principle. Making that health-giving light treatment available to anyone is the premise that led to a simple, revolutionary instrument developed for in-home use by Johan Boswinkel, a pioneer in the field for 30 years.
German physicist Fritz-Albert Popp, who reinvented the way we think about biophotons, demonstrated that every cell in the body emitted an extremely faint light. He showed that these particles, or biophotons, direct the body’s biochemical processes. And Popp found that each cell gave off either a coherent, “healthy” light or a chaotic type, which indicated the presence of disease. The explanation is simple: If biophotons guide our biochemical processes in a disorderly fashion, there will be disruption, and we’ll experience that disruption as illness.
Inspired by this work, in the 1980s Johan Boswinkel developed an instrument that combined Popp’s findings with the principles of electro-acupuncture.
Electro-acupuncture is based on the electromagnetic current at acupuncture points—each of which is linked to a particular organ or gland—which clearly deviates from that of the surrounding skin.
Measurements taken with Boswinkel’s original instrument, the Chiren, yielded two results: The machine showed either a straight line, representing a powerful, consistent current at the point of measurement, or a hyperbola, indicating an ebbing current and hence a weakness at the acupuncture point—and in its associated organ.
Treatment consists of correcting disrupted light frequencies. The patient holds two glass electrodes, one of which absorbs the “polluted” light emitted by the body. The instrument “purifies” the light’s frequency and returns it to the body via the other electrode. This purification involves the potency principles of homeopathy, which is also based on frequencies. The patient is treated with his or her own light (for an extensive report on Boswinkel’s work, see the July/August 2011 issue of Ode).
Over the past few decades, Boswinkel has treated thousands of people, with remarkable results. He claims an 80 percent success rate and points out that his patients are usually chronic cases who have already exhausted the usual medical options. His success is driving a fast-growing demand
for biophoton therapy. Though Boswinkel has trained hundreds of therapists worldwide, there’s still a big gap between supply and demand.
Thus, he’s spent years looking for a simple do-it-yourself solution that would enable people to benefit from biophoton medicine without having to visit a therapist. He recently found it, introducing a simplified version of his therapeutic measuring and treatment tool. The Chikey, or “light key,” can’t measure frequency disruptions, but Boswinkel says its five basic programs can remedy 70 percent of ailments and symptoms. “I plan to use the Chikey in areas with few or no therapists,” Boswinkel says.
A therapist can perform an initial treatment at his or her practice and then prescribe follow-up treatments, which can be loaded onto the Chikey and administered by the patient at home. The instrument can be used preventively, too. Boswinkel says weekly treatments can support the body’s self-healing ability and significantly reduce the chance of serious problems developing.
The battery-powered, travel-friendly Chikey also contains a biofeedback system that allows direct observation of a treatment’s effect on the body. The instrument is safe; the only “active ingredient” is the body’s own light. “People need to realize what biophotons—their own light—can do for their health,” Boswinkel says.
The Chikey has another surprising application. Not only is light essential for the human body, it’s also the main building block of plants. But a plant’s light loses power if the plant is out of contact with its roots for too long. A head of lettuce that has spent a few days on a store shelf doesn’t just lose its freshness but its energy too. Put it in a bowl of water and give it two minutes with the Chikey, though, and its light will be restored.
As if that didn’t sound mysterious enough, the instrument can even be used to mellow and deepen the taste of wine. “This is a simple way to make wine years older and better in minutes,” Boswinkel says, hinting at a gap in the market. Similarly, the Chikey makes it easy to remove chlorine from drinking water, so it could come in handy for travelers. Biophoton treatment offers a simple, cheap and effective answer to a host of bothersome conditions and chronic symptoms. Now Johan Boswinkel has brought it within reach of the masses with a genuine “key to light.”
Photo: Pieter De Swart

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