North Korea’s quiet revolution is powered by solar panels

A limited power grid and regular blackouts are a way of life in North Korea. Including in winter when freezing temperatures reduces hydropower capacity. Over the past year, foreign observers have been noticing an unusual sight on a growing number of residential buildings in the capital Pyongyang and in other cities: solar panels. Some even claim the number has tripled over the past 12 months. Once reserved for Workers’ Party cadres, solar panels are now sold openly. Made locally or in China, their cost has plummeted there as it has around the world. A bounty for the 10% of the population who now own mobile phones requiring regular charging. A crack in the monolith?

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North Korea’s quiet revolution is powered by solar panels

A limited power grid and regular blackouts are a way of life in North Korea. Including in winter when freezing temperatures reduces hydropower capacity. Over the past year, foreign observers have been noticing an unusual sight on a growing number of residential buildings in the capital Pyongyang and in other cities: solar panels. Some even claim the number has tripled over the past 12 months. Once reserved for Workers’ Party cadres, solar panels are now sold openly. Made locally or in China, their cost has plummeted there as it has around the world. A bounty for the 10% of the population who now own mobile phones requiring regular charging. A crack in the monolith?

Solution News Source

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