The U.S. wants to dramatically reduce its water usage

At a roundtable discussion in Washington D.C., the White House announced that it will host a “Water Summit” for March 22, to spur innovation and conservation efforts for the world’s most valuable resource, and believes the U.S. can slash water usage by a third. Existing technology should make this possible, but the government will also be backing research for new innovations in water, with a goal set to cut the cost of desalinating water by 75%. In a water policy paper, the White House also highlighted that reducing water usage would benefit the economy greatly, considering pumping water in the U.S. is by far the largest usage of electricity—less water, lower energy costs. It marks the first time the White House has attempted any national discussion on how the nation uses water, and shows the U.S. is serious in upgrading its outdated water system.

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The U.S. wants to dramatically reduce its water usage

At a roundtable discussion in Washington D.C., the White House announced that it will host a “Water Summit” for March 22, to spur innovation and conservation efforts for the world’s most valuable resource, and believes the U.S. can slash water usage by a third. Existing technology should make this possible, but the government will also be backing research for new innovations in water, with a goal set to cut the cost of desalinating water by 75%. In a water policy paper, the White House also highlighted that reducing water usage would benefit the economy greatly, considering pumping water in the U.S. is by far the largest usage of electricity—less water, lower energy costs. It marks the first time the White House has attempted any national discussion on how the nation uses water, and shows the U.S. is serious in upgrading its outdated water system.

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