The ‘electric quadricycle’ could soon replace delivery trucks in busy cities

The air quality is really bad in cities like London and the traffic is really slow. Meanwhile, with the growth of online shopping, there are more and more delivery trucks clogging the streets. That’s where Electric Assisted Vehicles, or EAV, come in to play. The company just introduced an electric cargo bike, or more accurately, an electric quadricycle that could become revolutionary on the congested streets of London. The quadricycle steers like a traditional bike but has a 250-watt motor that gains power when the rider peddles. Simply by turning a crank, the rider gets a little electric assistance as it maneuvers around the city. Better yet, the quadricycle is narrow enough to fit down a cycle path but strong enough to hold up to a 150 kg payload without creating any emissions. To make the vehicle even greener, the shell of the quadricycle is made out of “hemp fibers stuck together with a resin based on the oil from cashew nut shells.” If you want to find out what it’s like to ride in one of these E-cargo bikes, take a look at this story from Lloyd Alter, one of the editors over at Treehugger.

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The ‘electric quadricycle’ could soon replace delivery trucks in busy cities

The air quality is really bad in cities like London and the traffic is really slow. Meanwhile, with the growth of online shopping, there are more and more delivery trucks clogging the streets. That’s where Electric Assisted Vehicles, or EAV, come in to play. The company just introduced an electric cargo bike, or more accurately, an electric quadricycle that could become revolutionary on the congested streets of London. The quadricycle steers like a traditional bike but has a 250-watt motor that gains power when the rider peddles. Simply by turning a crank, the rider gets a little electric assistance as it maneuvers around the city. Better yet, the quadricycle is narrow enough to fit down a cycle path but strong enough to hold up to a 150 kg payload without creating any emissions. To make the vehicle even greener, the shell of the quadricycle is made out of “hemp fibers stuck together with a resin based on the oil from cashew nut shells.” If you want to find out what it’s like to ride in one of these E-cargo bikes, take a look at this story from Lloyd Alter, one of the editors over at Treehugger.

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