Today’s Solutions: September 25, 2021

Did you know grasshoppers can be bright pink? Neither did we—until this past weekend when an eye-catching story was published by an NBC affiliate in Texas. Apparently, a three-year-old discovered a bubble-gum pink grasshopper while exploring his garden in Austin, which prompted his mother to snap a photo of the pink grasshopper and put it online.

Now you might be asking: why is the grasshopper pink? According to National Geographic Explorer Victoria Hillman, it’s the result of a condition known as erythrism, whereby a recessive gene similar to those affecting albino animals is passed on. Instead of a complete loss of pigmentation, erythrism sees a complete replacement of normal pigment with an “exceptional prevalence” of red pigmentation.

Pink grasshoppers do exist, but you hardly see them because their color makes them easy to spot for predators, thus making it extremely hard to make it to adulthood. Anyway, we’re happy to have seen one now!

Solutions News Source Print this article
Todays Solutions

New York aims to ban the sale of all ...

We wrote recently about New York City’s plan to create an expansive electrical vehicle (EV) charging network as part of ... Read More

Richmond, VA unveils Emancipation and...

Last week we shared how a controversial Robert E. Lee statue was finally removed from Virginia’s capital. In an acknowledgment ... Read More

Spain to ban plastic wrapping on frui...

After years of campaigning from green activists to stop grocers and large supermarkets alike from wrapping fresh produce in plastic ... Read More

Popular New York clothing store now o...

Shoppers who visit the Madewell store in Brooklyn will find a surprise if they head up to the location’s second ... Read More

3 Strategies to dodge remote work bur...

The pandemic has forced many of us to adjust to working remotely, which has its benefits, but also comes with ... Read More