One benefit of COVID-19: reduced global carbon emissions

Finding the silver lining in the dark cloud of COVID-19 can be difficult, but one particular upside to the situation could be found in our skies themselves. Greenhouse gas emissions have decreased significantly and could hit their lowest level of the decade. 

Due to reduced industry activity and cut backs on non-essential travel, New York is reporting a notable decrease in carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide emissions. The estimated drop in atmospheric carbon dioxide in the city is between five and ten percent.

Air pollution is also falling. Areas such as China and Italy, where COVID-19 impacts have halted daily life, are experiencing much lower air pollution levels. This is beneficial as the virus impacts those with respiratory issues more severely. 

It’s not just pollution being affected. As we covered in our other story about Venetian canals today, animal populations are returning to cities as well. 

Could the virus serve as a reset button on emissions from our cars and industries? Perhaps. If governments use this opportunity to re-stimulate the economy with green, renewable energy investments and jobs, one lasting impact of the coronavirus could be a cleaner planet.

Solution News Source

One benefit of COVID-19: reduced global carbon emissions

Finding the silver lining in the dark cloud of COVID-19 can be difficult, but one particular upside to the situation could be found in our skies themselves. Greenhouse gas emissions have decreased significantly and could hit their lowest level of the decade. 

Due to reduced industry activity and cut backs on non-essential travel, New York is reporting a notable decrease in carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide emissions. The estimated drop in atmospheric carbon dioxide in the city is between five and ten percent.

Air pollution is also falling. Areas such as China and Italy, where COVID-19 impacts have halted daily life, are experiencing much lower air pollution levels. This is beneficial as the virus impacts those with respiratory issues more severely. 

It’s not just pollution being affected. As we covered in our other story about Venetian canals today, animal populations are returning to cities as well. 

Could the virus serve as a reset button on emissions from our cars and industries? Perhaps. If governments use this opportunity to re-stimulate the economy with green, renewable energy investments and jobs, one lasting impact of the coronavirus could be a cleaner planet.

Solution News Source

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