Mountain gorilla numbers are on the rise in East Africa

Good news from the WWF! A new survey that took place in the Virunga mountains of East Africa found that mountain gorilla numbers are growing.

The critically endangered animals were once expected to be extinct by the end of the twentieth century, but there is hope the population will continue to grow due to conservation efforts. Findings show populations in the Virunga Massif have grown to 604 individuals, up from 480 individuals in 2010. This puts the total global wild gorilla population over 1,000 individuals.

While that may not be a huge increase, it’s an improvement—something we sadly are not seeing with other species of great apes. The Virunga Massif spans 111,445 acres in the DRC, Rwanda, and Uganda and is one of only two isolated areas mountain gorillas live.

Field teams surveyed the region to determine the population and demographics of mountain gorillas. For the first time, field teams used electronic devices to collect data and information about the mountain dwellers and threats they may face. With the new findings, the WWF can reshape their conservation strategy for the better in order to secure a future for mountain gorillas.

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Mountain gorilla numbers are on the rise in East Africa

Good news from the WWF! A new survey that took place in the Virunga mountains of East Africa found that mountain gorilla numbers are growing.

The critically endangered animals were once expected to be extinct by the end of the twentieth century, but there is hope the population will continue to grow due to conservation efforts. Findings show populations in the Virunga Massif have grown to 604 individuals, up from 480 individuals in 2010. This puts the total global wild gorilla population over 1,000 individuals.

While that may not be a huge increase, it’s an improvement—something we sadly are not seeing with other species of great apes. The Virunga Massif spans 111,445 acres in the DRC, Rwanda, and Uganda and is one of only two isolated areas mountain gorillas live.

Field teams surveyed the region to determine the population and demographics of mountain gorillas. For the first time, field teams used electronic devices to collect data and information about the mountain dwellers and threats they may face. With the new findings, the WWF can reshape their conservation strategy for the better in order to secure a future for mountain gorillas.

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