Retreating ice in Norway has revealed treasure troves of Viking artifacts

At the Optimist Daily, we’re deeply concerned with global heating and its melting effect on Arctic glaciers. But as a publication that is always willing to see the silver lining in any situation, it’s been fascinating to see what archaeologists discover as the ice retreats.

Recently in Norway, researchers discovered a lost Viking mountain pass strewn with artifacts, according to a new study in the journal Antiquity. When the researchers traipsed into the abandoned mountain pass that is rapidly melting due to warmer global temperatures, they found broken sleds, tools and other elements of daily life dating back nearly 2,000 years, as National Geographic reported.

They found nearly 1,000 artifacts that run the gamut from 300 to 1500 AD, with the mountain pass falling out of use after the Black Death in the medieval period. The researchers used carbon dating to pinpoint when each finding is from. The bulk of what they collected comes from the period around 1000 AD at the height of the Viking era when trade and mobility in the region peaked, according to The Guardian.

It is a dream discovery for any archaeologist and one that reveals to us a rich history of ancient Viking life.

Solution News Source

Retreating ice in Norway has revealed treasure troves of Viking artifacts

At the Optimist Daily, we’re deeply concerned with global heating and its melting effect on Arctic glaciers. But as a publication that is always willing to see the silver lining in any situation, it’s been fascinating to see what archaeologists discover as the ice retreats.

Recently in Norway, researchers discovered a lost Viking mountain pass strewn with artifacts, according to a new study in the journal Antiquity. When the researchers traipsed into the abandoned mountain pass that is rapidly melting due to warmer global temperatures, they found broken sleds, tools and other elements of daily life dating back nearly 2,000 years, as National Geographic reported.

They found nearly 1,000 artifacts that run the gamut from 300 to 1500 AD, with the mountain pass falling out of use after the Black Death in the medieval period. The researchers used carbon dating to pinpoint when each finding is from. The bulk of what they collected comes from the period around 1000 AD at the height of the Viking era when trade and mobility in the region peaked, according to The Guardian.

It is a dream discovery for any archaeologist and one that reveals to us a rich history of ancient Viking life.

Solution News Source

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