Texans will catch the first glimpse of residential wind power this July 4th

What if you could produce wind energy from the comfort of your backyard? Well, that might soon be possible thanks to a new product made by Iceland renewable wind power company IceWind.

In the town of Port Aransas Beach, Texas, IceWind’s Texas-based investor will show off a demo of the tiny turbine to Texans this July 4th. Unlike most wind turbines, which have a horizontal axis, IceWind’s new residential model sports vertical axes. Apparently, this also helps the turbines be bird-safe. 

“The concept is simple: We’re taking time tested technologies and bringing them into the modern era,” said IceWind CEO Saethor Asgeirsson. “Using super-strong materials such as aerospace-grade aluminum, carbon fiber, and high-grade stainless steel, our turbines are built to withstand anything.”

This includes Iceland’s furious winds, which regularly surpass 50 mph during the island country’s dark and chilly wintertime. IceWind has yet to release details about how much energy the microturbine can produce, but they believe their 4th of July display “represents independence from fossil fuels over this appropriate weekend.”

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Texans will catch the first glimpse of residential wind power this July 4th

What if you could produce wind energy from the comfort of your backyard? Well, that might soon be possible thanks to a new product made by Iceland renewable wind power company IceWind.

In the town of Port Aransas Beach, Texas, IceWind’s Texas-based investor will show off a demo of the tiny turbine to Texans this July 4th. Unlike most wind turbines, which have a horizontal axis, IceWind’s new residential model sports vertical axes. Apparently, this also helps the turbines be bird-safe. 

“The concept is simple: We’re taking time tested technologies and bringing them into the modern era,” said IceWind CEO Saethor Asgeirsson. “Using super-strong materials such as aerospace-grade aluminum, carbon fiber, and high-grade stainless steel, our turbines are built to withstand anything.”

This includes Iceland’s furious winds, which regularly surpass 50 mph during the island country’s dark and chilly wintertime. IceWind has yet to release details about how much energy the microturbine can produce, but they believe their 4th of July display “represents independence from fossil fuels over this appropriate weekend.”

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