Iconic rock band performs live concert in socially distant bubbles

Social distancing at a live rock concert may sound like a pipe dream, but the iconic rock band The Flaming Lips recently proved otherwise.

On Monday, the band performed its first concert since the coronavirus pandemic started for a live audience in Oklahoma City, where everyone was entirely protected in inflatable space bubbles.

As part of the performance, both band and audience members were encased in giant inflatable bubbles for a multi-sensory performance experience — a creative way to hold a concert during a pandemic.

In one of the video recording the live concert, frontman Wayne Coyne can be seen serenading a crowd of bubbled audience members, while doing the closest approximation of a crowd surf at hand.

“I think that’s kind of the dilemma we’re all in is that we are waiting for it to go back to normal or are we starting to plot, ‘What’s the future look like? What is the future of live music?’” Coyne commented on the performance.

The Flaming Lips suggest that the bubbles — which Coyne says give him enough air for several hours — could be a way to get the live music industry back on track. If you’re curious to see how the bubble-wrapped gig looked like, look no further than here.

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Iconic rock band performs live concert in socially distant bubbles

Social distancing at a live rock concert may sound like a pipe dream, but the iconic rock band The Flaming Lips recently proved otherwise.

On Monday, the band performed its first concert since the coronavirus pandemic started for a live audience in Oklahoma City, where everyone was entirely protected in inflatable space bubbles.

As part of the performance, both band and audience members were encased in giant inflatable bubbles for a multi-sensory performance experience — a creative way to hold a concert during a pandemic.

In one of the video recording the live concert, frontman Wayne Coyne can be seen serenading a crowd of bubbled audience members, while doing the closest approximation of a crowd surf at hand.

“I think that’s kind of the dilemma we’re all in is that we are waiting for it to go back to normal or are we starting to plot, ‘What’s the future look like? What is the future of live music?’” Coyne commented on the performance.

The Flaming Lips suggest that the bubbles — which Coyne says give him enough air for several hours — could be a way to get the live music industry back on track. If you’re curious to see how the bubble-wrapped gig looked like, look no further than here.

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