Election day: These are the climate measures to keep an eye out for

There is more on the line in the upcoming elections than just the White House. Across the nation, many local ballots feature key measures with regards to clean energy and climate change that voters will decide on. With election day approaching, Inhabitat has highlighted some of the critical measures worth keeping an eye on, which you can find below.

In Alaska, Measure 1 could quadruple the taxes collected from oil companies if passed. Meanwhile, in Denver, Measure 2A seeks to raise local sales taxes and redirect the funds to greenhouse gas reduction programs.

California has a whole bunch of green-minded measures featuring on local ballots across the state. Long Beach, for instance, has introduced Measure US, which would increase the tax on local oil production with the aim of raising $1.6 million annually and use that money to fund youth programs as well as a climate action plan. Berkeley’s ballot includes Measure HH, a proposed 2.5 percent tax increase on gas and electric utilities. That money will go towards combating carbon emissions locally. Nearby Albany has a similar proposal, Measure DD, to increase electricity and gas utility taxes in order to reduce pollution.

Other issues showing up on ballots include the Columbus, Ohio Issue 1 and the Nevada Question 6. Issue 1 would “establish an Electric Aggregation Program, which would allow the city to aggregate the retail electrical load of customers within the city’s boundaries, and allowing customers to opt-out of the program.”

On the other hand, Question 6 asks voters whether the state should provide half their electricity from renewable sources by 2030.

While these measures may play a key role in ushering in greener policies across the country, the outcome of these measures will also be useful in helping us gauge how concerned Americans are with climate change. Make sure to keep an eye out for the results and, of course, don’t forget to vote!

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Election day: These are the climate measures to keep an eye out for

There is more on the line in the upcoming elections than just the White House. Across the nation, many local ballots feature key measures with regards to clean energy and climate change that voters will decide on. With election day approaching, Inhabitat has highlighted some of the critical measures worth keeping an eye on, which you can find below.

In Alaska, Measure 1 could quadruple the taxes collected from oil companies if passed. Meanwhile, in Denver, Measure 2A seeks to raise local sales taxes and redirect the funds to greenhouse gas reduction programs.

California has a whole bunch of green-minded measures featuring on local ballots across the state. Long Beach, for instance, has introduced Measure US, which would increase the tax on local oil production with the aim of raising $1.6 million annually and use that money to fund youth programs as well as a climate action plan. Berkeley’s ballot includes Measure HH, a proposed 2.5 percent tax increase on gas and electric utilities. That money will go towards combating carbon emissions locally. Nearby Albany has a similar proposal, Measure DD, to increase electricity and gas utility taxes in order to reduce pollution.

Other issues showing up on ballots include the Columbus, Ohio Issue 1 and the Nevada Question 6. Issue 1 would “establish an Electric Aggregation Program, which would allow the city to aggregate the retail electrical load of customers within the city’s boundaries, and allowing customers to opt-out of the program.”

On the other hand, Question 6 asks voters whether the state should provide half their electricity from renewable sources by 2030.

While these measures may play a key role in ushering in greener policies across the country, the outcome of these measures will also be useful in helping us gauge how concerned Americans are with climate change. Make sure to keep an eye out for the results and, of course, don’t forget to vote!

Solution News Source

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