Today’s Solutions: June 29, 2022

Conservation

Nature relies on a rich diversity of organisms to keep it in balance. Conservation plays a key role in ensuring that environmental equilibrium is preserved. Learn about the solutions spearheading our efforts to promote biodiversity, safeguard vital ecosystems, and protect endangered species.

view of Eiffel Tower from the Seine

Paris protestors save trees around the Eiffel Tower

Environmental activists defending more than 40 trees surrounding the Eiffel Tower in Paris celebrate a tree-umphant win after weeks of protest.  The city of Paris planned to clear the area around the iconic tower on the Champ-de-Mars to make the tower more accessible and the area around it Read More...

Trail with steps in urban forest

The Ivory Coast is building a wall to protect nature reserve from pollution

The world’s second-biggest urban park is located in the city of Abidjan on the Ivory Coast. Though the Banco National Park provides valuable ecosystem services to the city, the park has been suffering from pollution and illegal tree felling in recent years. In a bid to help protect the natural Read More...

Aerial view of observation tower with Finnish flag among blue lakes and green forests in summer Finland.

Finland is the first country to pass a legally binding carbon negativity act

Many countries are putting forth considerable efforts to fight climate change and reach ambitious targets of net-zero emissions. However, Finland has decided to take it up a notch. Finland’s parliament recently passed a new Climate Change Act which legally binds it to its commitment to Read More...

Chilean Cyprus

World’s oldest tree may actually live in Chile after all, not California

The Great Basin Bristlecone Pine in California is currently considered the oldest living tree in the world, at 4,853 years old. A cypress tree in Chile, however, now challenges that record. Dr. Jonathan Barichivich, a researcher in Chile, believes that a Patagonian cypress, locally known as the Read More...

Crops

Stanford study shows cleaner air leads to more crops

Fertile soil, good seasons, and plentiful water aren’t the only things that affect our crops. Air pollution, and one air pollutant in particular, negatively affect the number of crops we can grow.  Using satellite imaging, Stanford researchers discovered just how many nitrogen oxides affect Read More...

Wandering Salamander

Biologists uncover secrets of parachuting salamanders

A recent study published in Current Biology sheds light on a peculiar adaptation of California’s wandering salamanders, Aneides vagrans. These amphibians are commonly associated with streams, rocks, and decaying logs. The wandering salamander, however, is commonly found in trees and even jumping Read More...

right whale jumps out of the water

New device helps protect endangered whales from crashing into ships

North Atlantic right whale populations used to thrive in the ocean. As of 2021, though, approximately 300 right whales remain in the wild, a steep drop from 480 right whales counted in 2011. Reasons for the decline of the right whale population include entanglement in fishing nets, habitat loss, Read More...

G7

G7 countries plan to stop fossil fuel development overseas

Environmental and energy ministers from the world’s largest economies agreed to stop funding any overseas fossil fuel development by the end of 2022. This will cut off investment in high carbon pollution programs that threaten the world from meeting its climate targets. The G7 countries Read More...

A Jaguar in the Amazon rainforest. Iquitos, Peru.

Wildlife Conservation Society builds massive database of Amazonian wildlife

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) scientists have been working on an enormous project: building an extensive database of the wide array of wildlife in the sprawling Amazon Basin. For this study, an international team of 147 scientists hailing from 122 research institutions and nature Read More...

three dolphins looking into the camera

Marine biologists come up with effective low-tech solution to bycatch

Bycatch, which is the accidental capture of non-target species such as dolphins, marine turtles, and seabirds, is a pervasive problem in the fishing industry. Thousands of whales, dolphins, and porpoises drown from getting entangled in nets and lobster potlines every year. The problem is that Read More...