Today’s Solutions: June 12, 2024

Nasal Spray

Could nasal sprays be a new measure against viruses?

Immunization efforts have done wonders to slow the spread of Covid and the rate of hospitalizations and serious cases of infection. The plummet in serious cases has been music to the ears of patients and medical professionals alike, even though strains of the virus have evolved to sneak around Read More...

Boy Patient

Daily steroid treatment safe and helpful for children with muscular dystrophy

Many of us listen with apprehension when a doctor suggests steroids because they have a bad reputation, and justifiably so. Steroid use can have long-term consequences like stunted growth, reduced bone density, and even compromised glandular function.  As patients, we should get all the Read More...

Intubation

Wireless video could make intubation safer

Intubation is a drastic yet necessary procedure that medical professionals perform to open patients’ airways. While it can be a real lifesaver, intubation is difficult to perform, and sometimes the tube can be placed incorrectly.  A specialized, 3D-printed device with a small wireless camera Read More...

Monitoring brainwaves during s

Monitoring brainwaves during sleep can pinpoint best antidepressant

One major problem with antidepressants is that patients have to take the drug for at least a month to know whether or not it works. But that could soon change after researchers found a quicker, more effective way to gauge the effectiveness of an antidepressant: monitoring a patient’s brainwaves Read More...

Creating medicine for diseases

Creating medicine for diseases caused by poverty

Maverick medical researchers do what pharmaceutical companies will not Jay Walljasper | November 2006 issue When you combine two important subjects covered in the headlines these days—world poverty and extravagant profits in the health-care industry—a challenging and depressing new issue Read More...

Poor countries are guinea pigs

Poor countries are guinea pigs for pharmaceutical tests

Poor countries are guinea pigs for pharmaceutical tests Tijn Touber| October 2006 issue John Le Carré’s bestselling novel The Constant Gardener showed how pharmaceutical companies test new medicines in Africa, even when troubling questions exist about their safety and reliability. Unfortunately, Read More...