Sleep does more for your health than looks

A quick fix to a late night is grabbing a coffee on the way to work or picking up one of those few hour energy drinks. Consuming high levels of caffeine or taurine wakes you up and is just like getting a few more hours of sleep, right? Wrong. Studies have found that not getting enough sleep, 5 hours or fewer, can lead to serious health problems like diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease.

Moreover, a study recently conducted by the University College London of 11,000 children found that adolescent’s cognition is negatively affected when not allowed to get a regularly scheduled nightly REM cycle. The study proved that sleep and

bedtimes have a direct relation to adolescent cognition. When a child doesn’t get full sleep cycles at regular intervals they have difficulty storing and processing new information.

Jay Walljasper, author and contributor to the Intelligent Optimist, touched on the topic of sleep in his article “Good night!” which examines the science behind the importance of a full 8 hours. “Healthy operation of our bodies’ hormonal functions, which are increasingly linked to strong immune systems [… ] appears to be one of the chief benefits of sufficient sleep” Walljasper explains. Other benefits of getting enough sleep include lower stress levels, increased alertness, and a boost to your metabolism.

Sleep is nature’s preventative medicine. You can’t “catch up” on sleep once the night is over, you can only get enough of it before the day begins. If you’re having trouble sleeping at night like millions of Americans try one of these these tips for getting a good nights sleep:

  • Set a sleep schedule. According to Dr. Breus, author of The Doctor’s diet plan, this is the best way to get your biological clock in a healthy rhythm.
  • Stop drinking caffeine after 2pm. Caffeine stays in your body for around 8 hours and can keep you from falling into deep sleep.
  • Make your room as dark as possible. Light sources tell your brain it’s time to wake up, eliminating them can help you get to sleep sooner.

Need more tips? Click here to see the full list.

Did you get your free issue of the Intelligent Optimist?  Click here for a free download.

Photo: flickr.com/Angelo Amboldi

Solution News Source

Sleep does more for your health than looks

A quick fix to a late night is grabbing a coffee on the way to work or picking up one of those few hour energy drinks. Consuming high levels of caffeine or taurine wakes you up and is just like getting a few more hours of sleep, right? Wrong. Studies have found that not getting enough sleep, 5 hours or fewer, can lead to serious health problems like diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease.

Moreover, a study recently conducted by the University College London of 11,000 children found that adolescent’s cognition is negatively affected when not allowed to get a regularly scheduled nightly REM cycle. The study proved that sleep and

bedtimes have a direct relation to adolescent cognition. When a child doesn’t get full sleep cycles at regular intervals they have difficulty storing and processing new information.

Jay Walljasper, author and contributor to the Intelligent Optimist, touched on the topic of sleep in his article “Good night!” which examines the science behind the importance of a full 8 hours. “Healthy operation of our bodies’ hormonal functions, which are increasingly linked to strong immune systems [… ] appears to be one of the chief benefits of sufficient sleep” Walljasper explains. Other benefits of getting enough sleep include lower stress levels, increased alertness, and a boost to your metabolism.

Sleep is nature’s preventative medicine. You can’t “catch up” on sleep once the night is over, you can only get enough of it before the day begins. If you’re having trouble sleeping at night like millions of Americans try one of these these tips for getting a good nights sleep:

  • Set a sleep schedule. According to Dr. Breus, author of The Doctor’s diet plan, this is the best way to get your biological clock in a healthy rhythm.
  • Stop drinking caffeine after 2pm. Caffeine stays in your body for around 8 hours and can keep you from falling into deep sleep.
  • Make your room as dark as possible. Light sources tell your brain it’s time to wake up, eliminating them can help you get to sleep sooner.

Need more tips? Click here to see the full list.

Did you get your free issue of the Intelligent Optimist?  Click here for a free download.

Photo: flickr.com/Angelo Amboldi

Solution News Source

SIGN UP

TO GET A Free DAILY DOSE OF OPTIMISM


We respect your privacy and take protecting it seriously. Privacy Policy