Innovative products make off-the-grid life a little easier

Access to power sources in developing countries is of growing concern, especially as households there depend more and more on phones and other technology for communication and livelihood. Each year, 77 billion liters of fuel is burned to light houses that have no power. Around 20% of the world’s population lives without electricity, and sources of light and fuel like kerosene and coal can be not just expensive, but environmentally and physically damaging. While replacements to coal and kerosene won’t be adopted over night, companies like Wewi, Wolff Olins, and Deciwatt see the detrimental impact of employing conventional methods of light and energy production and have created alternatives that are green and targeted for use in the developing world.

SOL by Wewi

Being marketed as a ‘sports utility laptop’, the SOL by Wewi is the first completely solar powered laptop. The SOL looks like a regular single-hinged laptop except on the back of the screen, where four solar panels unfold to power the laptop when it is placed in the sun. The SOL runs Ubuntu—a free open source operating system—its battery lasts for 8 to 10 hours, it comes with a built in modem and Wi-Fi router, and will cost around $300.

Little Sun by Wolff Olins

Founded in 1965, and recognized by Fast Company as “one of today’s boldest branding and innovation firms,” Wolff Olins has designed a solar powered lamp that might help replace kerosene as the go-to power source for lighting in the developing world. The Little Sun is a small hand held light that gets its power via solar panel on the back of the device. Exposing the solar panel to sunlight for 5 hours will power the light for 3-5 hours, and the built in battery will last for 3 years without needing replacement. You can order a Little Sun online for $25.

GravityLight by Deciwatt

Deciwatt is another company looking to provide light to the 1.2 billion people across the world that lives without electricity, and their product is the GravityLight. The GravityLight, as the name implies, harnesses gravity via a pulley-system to power a small LED: a string with hooks on the ends runs through the body, and a 10-pound weight to it will power the device for 25 minutes. Still in its testing phase, the GravityLight should be available in the coming months and will cost about $10.

With one fifth of the world living off the electrical grid, there is a big market for companies to provide products that don’t require an outlet for use. Alternative power sources are becoming more efficient and innovative firms like these are harnessing these new technologies to make a difference.

Did you get your free issue of the Intelligent Optimist?  Click here for a free download.

Solution News Source

Innovative products make off-the-grid life a little easier

Access to power sources in developing countries is of growing concern, especially as households there depend more and more on phones and other technology for communication and livelihood. Each year, 77 billion liters of fuel is burned to light houses that have no power. Around 20% of the world’s population lives without electricity, and sources of light and fuel like kerosene and coal can be not just expensive, but environmentally and physically damaging. While replacements to coal and kerosene won’t be adopted over night, companies like Wewi, Wolff Olins, and Deciwatt see the detrimental impact of employing conventional methods of light and energy production and have created alternatives that are green and targeted for use in the developing world.

SOL by Wewi

Being marketed as a ‘sports utility laptop’, the SOL by Wewi is the first completely solar powered laptop. The SOL looks like a regular single-hinged laptop except on the back of the screen, where four solar panels unfold to power the laptop when it is placed in the sun. The SOL runs Ubuntu—a free open source operating system—its battery lasts for 8 to 10 hours, it comes with a built in modem and Wi-Fi router, and will cost around $300.

Little Sun by Wolff Olins

Founded in 1965, and recognized by Fast Company as “one of today’s boldest branding and innovation firms,” Wolff Olins has designed a solar powered lamp that might help replace kerosene as the go-to power source for lighting in the developing world. The Little Sun is a small hand held light that gets its power via solar panel on the back of the device. Exposing the solar panel to sunlight for 5 hours will power the light for 3-5 hours, and the built in battery will last for 3 years without needing replacement. You can order a Little Sun online for $25.

GravityLight by Deciwatt

Deciwatt is another company looking to provide light to the 1.2 billion people across the world that lives without electricity, and their product is the GravityLight. The GravityLight, as the name implies, harnesses gravity via a pulley-system to power a small LED: a string with hooks on the ends runs through the body, and a 10-pound weight to it will power the device for 25 minutes. Still in its testing phase, the GravityLight should be available in the coming months and will cost about $10.

With one fifth of the world living off the electrical grid, there is a big market for companies to provide products that don’t require an outlet for use. Alternative power sources are becoming more efficient and innovative firms like these are harnessing these new technologies to make a difference.

Did you get your free issue of the Intelligent Optimist?  Click here for a free download.

Solution News Source

SIGN UP

TO GET A Free DAILY DOSE OF OPTIMISM


We respect your privacy and take protecting it seriously. Privacy Policy