Organic farming could be the key to feeding the world as global warming takes hold

Organic farming has long been considered irrelevant when it comes to tackling hunger, but one of the biggest studies ever carried out on the practice has concluded that it could play a major role as global warming starts to take effect. The study out of Washington State University found that chemical-free agricultures restores soil and have a much greater crop yield then expected. In ideal conditions, chemically driven crops can yield 8-25 percent more crops, although researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, recently found that the deficit could be more than halved by rotation crops and avoiding monocultures. What’s more important is that the study found that organic farming actually has better yields in areas facing drought as natural soil can retain moisture much better. For farmers in developing countries, the news is more than welcomed with artificial fertilizer or pesticide prices being high. As the world faces more widespread drought, the information from this study could encourage farmers to go natural to protect their lands and increase crop yields.

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Organic farming could be the key to feeding the world as global warming takes hold

Organic farming has long been considered irrelevant when it comes to tackling hunger, but one of the biggest studies ever carried out on the practice has concluded that it could play a major role as global warming starts to take effect. The study out of Washington State University found that chemical-free agricultures restores soil and have a much greater crop yield then expected. In ideal conditions, chemically driven crops can yield 8-25 percent more crops, although researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, recently found that the deficit could be more than halved by rotation crops and avoiding monocultures. What’s more important is that the study found that organic farming actually has better yields in areas facing drought as natural soil can retain moisture much better. For farmers in developing countries, the news is more than welcomed with artificial fertilizer or pesticide prices being high. As the world faces more widespread drought, the information from this study could encourage farmers to go natural to protect their lands and increase crop yields.

Solution News Source

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