This robot could eventually rid the agricultural sector of pesticides

Nowadays, the adoption of automated robots is a common practice among many industries that seek to improve their effectiveness – from automated robots that are tightening the knots and bolts on cars to automated hoovers that clean your home. Now, in efforts to stop the use of pesticides, researchers have developed an autonomous robot that uses ultraviolet light to kill diseases on strawberries. The robot, which goes by the name of Thorvald, emits ultraviolet light to kill common fungal diseases like the downy mildew, which attacks a variety of fruits and vegetables. For ultraviolet light to work efficiently, Thorvald is programmed to make its rounds on strawberry fields at night. It automatically drives across the field and exposes all the strawberry to ultraviolet light for a few seconds – which is enough to keep the strawberries safe for consumption. Researchers are hoping that the process will eventually eliminate or limit the use of pesticides in agriculture, making it safer for both the consumers and the environment.

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This robot could eventually rid the agricultural sector of pesticides

Nowadays, the adoption of automated robots is a common practice among many industries that seek to improve their effectiveness – from automated robots that are tightening the knots and bolts on cars to automated hoovers that clean your home. Now, in efforts to stop the use of pesticides, researchers have developed an autonomous robot that uses ultraviolet light to kill diseases on strawberries. The robot, which goes by the name of Thorvald, emits ultraviolet light to kill common fungal diseases like the downy mildew, which attacks a variety of fruits and vegetables. For ultraviolet light to work efficiently, Thorvald is programmed to make its rounds on strawberry fields at night. It automatically drives across the field and exposes all the strawberry to ultraviolet light for a few seconds – which is enough to keep the strawberries safe for consumption. Researchers are hoping that the process will eventually eliminate or limit the use of pesticides in agriculture, making it safer for both the consumers and the environment.

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