Researchers prepare first human trials for a bionic eye

Back in June, we shared a story about a new bionic eye created at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Now, a team of researchers and doctors in Australia are preparing for the world’s first human clinical trials of a bionic eye in hopes of soon distributing the innovative technology on a global scale.

The vision device, called the Gennaris bionic vision system, is the result of a ten year project and can theoretically restore vision for the blind using brain-implanted micro electrodes that make up for damaged optic nerves and facilitate a signal between the patient’s retina and the vision center of the brain. The brain implant works with a wearable headset, made up of a camera and a wireless transmitter, to restore at least partial vision. 

The device was developed by researchers at Monash University in Melbourne. In July, they successfully implanted the device into the brains of three sheep and have logged 2,700 hours of stimulation without any documented adverse effects. With additional funding, they hope to proceed with human trials in the near future. 

The team hopes to not only restore sight for the blind, but also eventually adapt the technology to treat neurological conditions like paralysis. 

This is just one of the numerous research groups around the world using new tech developments to provide solutions for some of the trickiest human medical conditions.

Solution News Source

Researchers prepare first human trials for a bionic eye

Back in June, we shared a story about a new bionic eye created at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Now, a team of researchers and doctors in Australia are preparing for the world’s first human clinical trials of a bionic eye in hopes of soon distributing the innovative technology on a global scale.

The vision device, called the Gennaris bionic vision system, is the result of a ten year project and can theoretically restore vision for the blind using brain-implanted micro electrodes that make up for damaged optic nerves and facilitate a signal between the patient’s retina and the vision center of the brain. The brain implant works with a wearable headset, made up of a camera and a wireless transmitter, to restore at least partial vision. 

The device was developed by researchers at Monash University in Melbourne. In July, they successfully implanted the device into the brains of three sheep and have logged 2,700 hours of stimulation without any documented adverse effects. With additional funding, they hope to proceed with human trials in the near future. 

The team hopes to not only restore sight for the blind, but also eventually adapt the technology to treat neurological conditions like paralysis. 

This is just one of the numerous research groups around the world using new tech developments to provide solutions for some of the trickiest human medical conditions.

Solution News Source

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