Today’s Solutions: January 19, 2022

Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic have determined that there is a drug that is already licensed and on the market that could be used to treat Alzheimer’s disease: Viagra.

Yes, that’s right, sildenafil (branded Viagra on the market) was identified out of more than 1,600 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs as the most likely to present effective treatment for the degenerative disease using a large gene-mapping network, as it targets both amyloid and tau, two stamps of Alzheimer’s, rather than just one or the other.

“Sildenafil, which has been shown to significantly improve cognition and memory in preclinical models, presented as the best drug candidate,” reports study lead Dr. Feixiong Cheng.

Following the results of the gene-mapping network, the researchers then used a database of more than seven million people’s claims in the US to explore the relationship between sildenafil and Alzheimer’s disease. They discovered that sildenafil users were 69 percent less likely to develop Alzheimer’s than non-sildenafil users after six years of follow-up. The researchers also published further findings on a lab model they developed that showed how sildenafil increased brain cell growth and targeted tau proteins in Nature Aging.

According to Cheng, there is not enough evidence to demonstrate a causal relationship between sildenafil and Alzheimer’s disease, but they will need to conduct randomized clinical trials with both sexes and a placebo control to determine sildenafil’s efficacy.

However, as Dr. Susan Kohlhaas, the director of research at Alzheimer’s Research UK says, “being able to repurpose a drug already licensed for other health conditions could help speed up the drug discovery process and bring about life-changing dementia treatments sooner.”

Source study: Nature AgingEndophenotype-based in silico network medicine discovery combined with insurance record data mining identifies sildenafil as a candidate drug for Alzheimer’s disease

Solutions News Source Print this article
More of Today's Solutions

The Philippines bans child marriage to help stop child abuse

According to a report issued last year by the United Nations Children’s Fund, more than half a billion girls and women across the globe were married as children, meaning under the age of majority (18). ... Read More

This circular leather alternative is made from algae and peels

As people are increasingly becoming reluctant to use clothes and fashion accessories made out of animal-sourced leather, more and more designers are turning their eyes towards more sustainable and ethical alternatives. One of the latest ... Read More

Rapidly retrofitting old buildings is key for climate goals – Here̵...

Buildings account for about 40 percent of annual global carbon emissions. In order to meet our climate goals, every building on the planet will have to be net-zero by 2050. But since most of the ... Read More

IKEA buys land ravaged by hurricane to transform into forests

The Optimist Daily has shared several stories about the popular Swedish furniture company IKEA and its environmentally friendly initiatives such as its buyback and resell program, its pledge to stop using plastic packaging, its zero-waste ... Read More

This market is tossing “use-by” dates to help curb food waste

The British supermarket Morrisons has decided to remove “use-by” dates on milk packaging by the end of the month in an effort to save millions of pints of milk from being needlessly thrown away each ... Read More

The population of Ugandan tree-climbing lions is growing

One of the only populations of Ishasha tree-climbing lions in the world resides in Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP). Unfortunately, the population faces numerous threats such as loss of habitat, climate change, and illegal ... Read More