Today’s Solutions: July 07, 2022

Oceans

From tackling marine plastic pollution to coral reef restoration, learn about humanity’s latest efforts to protect ocean habitats and marine wildlife.

A hydrofoil boat approaching the port of the greek island Hydra.

The environmentally friendly, flying ships of the future

These days, electric cars, bikes, scooters, trams, and trains are common modes of transport. However, one mode of transport which hasn’t got the electric memo is ferries, which are still almost exclusively powered by fossil fuels. The problematic factor here is battery capacity, which cannot last Read More...

Photograph of ugly fringehead Fish (Santa Cruz Island, CA).

"Ugly" reef fish need our help

Pretty privilege is not just a bias humans hold within our own species. According to a machine-learning study from the University of Montpellier, reef fish that people perceive as more beautiful are a higher priority for conservation support. In the study, 13,000 members of the public were asked Read More...

Yosemite

US unveils plan to ban single-use plastic in national parks

Plastic pollution is so prevalent that harmful plastic particles can even be found in drinking water. Robust action on a national scale is needed to stop the flood of plastics into natural environments.  Wednesday, on World Oceans Day, the White House announced its plans to phase out single-use Read More...

Humpback whale breaches water on Gold Coast

Australian whale-watching season gets an early start thanks to conservation

Suppose you’ve ever had the privilege of witnessing the majesty of a humpback whale breaching the water and slapping the surface with its flippers. In that case, you’ll probably agree that the sight is unforgettable. This year, whale watchers off the east coast of Australia are being treated Read More...

right whale jumps out of the water

New device helps protect endangered whales from crashing into ships

North Atlantic right whale populations used to thrive in the ocean. As of 2021, though, approximately 300 right whales remain in the wild, a steep drop from 480 right whales counted in 2011. Reasons for the decline of the right whale population include entanglement in fishing nets, habitat loss, Read More...

Seagrass

Scientists discover world’s largest plant off Australian coast

General Sherman is the largest tree in the world. It’s a giant sequoia in Sequoia National Park standing at 275 feet, nearly the length of a football field. It turns out, though, that General Sherman isn’t the biggest plant on earth.  Scientists have discovered a patch of seagrass off the Read More...

three dolphins looking into the camera

Marine biologists come up with effective low-tech solution to bycatch

Bycatch, which is the accidental capture of non-target species such as dolphins, marine turtles, and seabirds, is a pervasive problem in the fishing industry. Thousands of whales, dolphins, and porpoises drown from getting entangled in nets and lobster potlines every year. The problem is that Read More...

Beautiful coral reef and fish.

AI exposes coral reefs “singing”

Coral reefs are essential to ocean ecosystems, providing food and homes to all sorts of organisms. Learning as much as possible about these living creatures is important to protect all the life in the vast seas. A team from the University of Exeter is doing just that, creating an algorithm to Read More...

someone picks up littered cigarette butts on the beach

Catalonia launches recycling program to rid streets and beaches of cigarette butts 

The Catalan government is launching a clever plan to rid their streets and beaches of cigarette butts. As an added plus, the plan provides a small source of income for the homeless. According to the environmental organization Ocean Conservancy, cigarette butts are the most plentiful type of Read More...

Wildflowers in nature reserve in the UK

How ocean vegetables could help tackle the global food crisis

As the world population is expected to reach 9 billion people by 2050, we need to increase our food production by 70 percent to be able to feed everyone. But more importantly, we need to figure out ways to do it sustainably. Traditional agriculture won’t cut it because of growing water scarcity Read More...