In search of your calling

If you’re not sure what kind of work you are looking for, it may be useful to ask yourself some questions.

Tijn Touber | October 2003 issue
1. What (or who) makes me jealous? Although jealousy may not be the best of qualities, it tells you something about yourself. You might envy the teacher who has all summer off, the preacher people still listen to, or the music hall owner who gets to meet hip musicians.
2. Where would I like to be right now? Are you at your best by the seaside, or in the woods? Do you thrive on the city’s bustle and chaos, or are you more at home in a small village? Do you crave sunshine? Chances are that’s where you will find your dream job!
3. Do I want a good job or a good life? Your ‘true work’ may not always be a well-paid job, or even a paid job. There are more than enough examples of people who found their calling in volunteer work.
4. What does my body have to say? If you are growing tense or even ill from your present job, or from the type of work you are doing, then that’s a clear signal. Your body does not lie. Imagine having a different career, a different job, and feel the effect that has on your body.
5. What is my natural rhythm? Some people move slowly, like to do one thing at a time and have an eye for details. Others like action, speed and change. Different characters require different work.
6. What do I read and what do I listen to? Most people tend to read the newspaper their friends read, and watch and listen to the same programmes. In your search for your unique talents, it might help to find your own original sources of inspiration. Go to the library. Subscribe to a new magazine. Rent an old movie. Find a new means of stimulating your imagination and you might just learn something new about yourself.
7. What does my family say? It sometimes looks as if all the giants of this earth are self-made people. But you can learn from what those close to you say and think without getting pinned down. Dig out the old family tree and try and find out what your ancestors did. Chances are you will find clues based on common qualities, talents or interests.
8. Who are my heroes? This question could be dangerous. Although it is important to have an example to look up to, you sometimes need to kill your gods. Either way, identifying your heroes can help you make a clear career decision.

Solution News Source

In search of your calling

If you’re not sure what kind of work you are looking for, it may be useful to ask yourself some questions.

Tijn Touber | October 2003 issue
1. What (or who) makes me jealous? Although jealousy may not be the best of qualities, it tells you something about yourself. You might envy the teacher who has all summer off, the preacher people still listen to, or the music hall owner who gets to meet hip musicians.
2. Where would I like to be right now? Are you at your best by the seaside, or in the woods? Do you thrive on the city’s bustle and chaos, or are you more at home in a small village? Do you crave sunshine? Chances are that’s where you will find your dream job!
3. Do I want a good job or a good life? Your ‘true work’ may not always be a well-paid job, or even a paid job. There are more than enough examples of people who found their calling in volunteer work.
4. What does my body have to say? If you are growing tense or even ill from your present job, or from the type of work you are doing, then that’s a clear signal. Your body does not lie. Imagine having a different career, a different job, and feel the effect that has on your body.
5. What is my natural rhythm? Some people move slowly, like to do one thing at a time and have an eye for details. Others like action, speed and change. Different characters require different work.
6. What do I read and what do I listen to? Most people tend to read the newspaper their friends read, and watch and listen to the same programmes. In your search for your unique talents, it might help to find your own original sources of inspiration. Go to the library. Subscribe to a new magazine. Rent an old movie. Find a new means of stimulating your imagination and you might just learn something new about yourself.
7. What does my family say? It sometimes looks as if all the giants of this earth are self-made people. But you can learn from what those close to you say and think without getting pinned down. Dig out the old family tree and try and find out what your ancestors did. Chances are you will find clues based on common qualities, talents or interests.
8. Who are my heroes? This question could be dangerous. Although it is important to have an example to look up to, you sometimes need to kill your gods. Either way, identifying your heroes can help you make a clear career decision.

Solution News Source

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