Get rich slow with risotto

nvesting time in this dish pays off with great taste.

Elbrich Fennema | November 2009 issue
The old saying time is money used to apply in the kitchen. Those who had money and no time had someone else cook or ate out; those who had no money but had time cooked for themselves. Now, thanks to increasing efficiency in the food industry, cooking for yourself saves neither time nor money. But there’s still a good reason to do your own cooking: taste. Some dishes simply aren”t suited to being heated. Risotto is one. Risotto also offers the advantage of delivering efficiency at home; invite several people over to join you and make a big pan full.
Saut© two chopped onions, a clove of finely sliced garlic and thinly cut mushrooms in a generous spoonful of olive oil. Add 28 ounces (800 grams) of short-grain rice and stir until the grains become transparent. Meanwhile, have half a gallon (two liters) of bouillon ready, nearly at a boil. Steadily add three to four cups (just less than a liter) to the rice each time the liquid has been absorbed. Stir continuously. Ask your guests to take turns stirring while you scout out the contents of your fridge. Leftover chicken, chicory, shrimp or peas can all come back to life in risotto. Your dish will be ready in about 45 minutes: creamy but not mushy. Serve immediately with a little freshly grated parmesan cheese.
If you don’t finish the risotto in one sitting, shape the leftovers into walnut-sized balls, roll them through a beaten egg and bread crumbs, then fry them in butter until they’re dry. They make wonderful soup balls!

Solution News Source

Get rich slow with risotto

nvesting time in this dish pays off with great taste.

Elbrich Fennema | November 2009 issue
The old saying time is money used to apply in the kitchen. Those who had money and no time had someone else cook or ate out; those who had no money but had time cooked for themselves. Now, thanks to increasing efficiency in the food industry, cooking for yourself saves neither time nor money. But there’s still a good reason to do your own cooking: taste. Some dishes simply aren”t suited to being heated. Risotto is one. Risotto also offers the advantage of delivering efficiency at home; invite several people over to join you and make a big pan full.
Saut© two chopped onions, a clove of finely sliced garlic and thinly cut mushrooms in a generous spoonful of olive oil. Add 28 ounces (800 grams) of short-grain rice and stir until the grains become transparent. Meanwhile, have half a gallon (two liters) of bouillon ready, nearly at a boil. Steadily add three to four cups (just less than a liter) to the rice each time the liquid has been absorbed. Stir continuously. Ask your guests to take turns stirring while you scout out the contents of your fridge. Leftover chicken, chicory, shrimp or peas can all come back to life in risotto. Your dish will be ready in about 45 minutes: creamy but not mushy. Serve immediately with a little freshly grated parmesan cheese.
If you don’t finish the risotto in one sitting, shape the leftovers into walnut-sized balls, roll them through a beaten egg and bread crumbs, then fry them in butter until they’re dry. They make wonderful soup balls!

Solution News Source

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