Rio+20 conference and the green economy

Right now at the Rio+20 conference in Brazil, the United Nations is holding its biggest conference in history. World leaders are gathered to address issues and brainstorm ideas about sustainable development. The sentiments online are mixed—it’s not always easy to determine whether or not these conferences are helpful and effective, and some news sources have kept their expectations low.

One of the topics being discussed is the green economy. We’ve been barraged with enough examples of non-sustainable and non-green economies that it has become difficult for some to believe a green economy is even possible.

But it is! The United Nations has built a large database of projects and initiatives that are all leading us in the right direction. Click here to take a look at these wonderful green economy policies, practices and initiatives.

These projects show us that it’s possible. They also offer reassurance about how important it is that world leaders keep meeting, encouraging and inspiring each other, and making strides – together and separately – towards helping these projects come to fruition and one day become the majority.

Here’s just one exciting example:

Masdar City is an emerging global clean-technology hub located in what aims to be one of the world’s most sustainable urban development powered by renewable energy. This unique economic zone, located about 17 kilometers from downtown Abu Dhabi, will eventually be home to companies, a research institute and an investment arm, creating an international nerve center for companies and organizations focused on renewable energy and clean technologies. The city will implement policies aimed at zero waste, sustainable transport, building energy efficiency standards, biodiversity strategy policies and renewable energy requirements. Masdar City is being built to obtain 100% of its energy from renewable sources, including photovoltaics, concentrating solar power, wind, and waste to energy.

What are your thoughts on Rio+20? Please share with us in the comments section below. 

By Michelle Oznowicz

Solution News Source

Rio+20 conference and the green economy

Right now at the Rio+20 conference in Brazil, the United Nations is holding its biggest conference in history. World leaders are gathered to address issues and brainstorm ideas about sustainable development. The sentiments online are mixed—it’s not always easy to determine whether or not these conferences are helpful and effective, and some news sources have kept their expectations low.

One of the topics being discussed is the green economy. We’ve been barraged with enough examples of non-sustainable and non-green economies that it has become difficult for some to believe a green economy is even possible.

But it is! The United Nations has built a large database of projects and initiatives that are all leading us in the right direction. Click here to take a look at these wonderful green economy policies, practices and initiatives.

These projects show us that it’s possible. They also offer reassurance about how important it is that world leaders keep meeting, encouraging and inspiring each other, and making strides – together and separately – towards helping these projects come to fruition and one day become the majority.

Here’s just one exciting example:

Masdar City is an emerging global clean-technology hub located in what aims to be one of the world’s most sustainable urban development powered by renewable energy. This unique economic zone, located about 17 kilometers from downtown Abu Dhabi, will eventually be home to companies, a research institute and an investment arm, creating an international nerve center for companies and organizations focused on renewable energy and clean technologies. The city will implement policies aimed at zero waste, sustainable transport, building energy efficiency standards, biodiversity strategy policies and renewable energy requirements. Masdar City is being built to obtain 100% of its energy from renewable sources, including photovoltaics, concentrating solar power, wind, and waste to energy.

What are your thoughts on Rio+20? Please share with us in the comments section below. 

By Michelle Oznowicz

Solution News Source

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