Can coffee-waste furniture get people excited about sustainability?

Such is the bet made by British designer and materials development expert Adam Fairweather, who is striving to turn upcycling into an art form. His latest obssession are coffee grounds. Addressing food waste is less on his mind than “using materials that have a perceived value to them, to communicate and get people excited about the idea of sustainability and social change and environmental management.” Building a sustainable business model is still a work in progress, even though the coffee waste-based furniture items are selling like hotcakes, including to brand-conscious companies like Google. Coffee waste as a tool to successfully spread the sustainability conversation—who would have thought?

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Can coffee-waste furniture get people excited about sustainability?

Such is the bet made by British designer and materials development expert Adam Fairweather, who is striving to turn upcycling into an art form. His latest obssession are coffee grounds. Addressing food waste is less on his mind than “using materials that have a perceived value to them, to communicate and get people excited about the idea of sustainability and social change and environmental management.” Building a sustainable business model is still a work in progress, even though the coffee waste-based furniture items are selling like hotcakes, including to brand-conscious companies like Google. Coffee waste as a tool to successfully spread the sustainability conversation—who would have thought?

Solution News Source

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