New neuroscience report supports Buddhist belief that self is constantly changing

Neuroscientists are discovering what Buddhists have believed for ages: our self is not constant, but ever-changing. A new paper, published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences this month, links the Buddhist belief to physical areas of the brain. There’s scientific evidence that “self-processing in the brain is not instantiated in a particular region or network, but rather extends to a broad range of fluctuating neural processes that do not appear to be self specific,” write the authors. As Even Thompson, a philosophy of mind professor at the University of British Columbia, says, “There’s nothing that corresponds to the sense that there’s an unchanging self.”

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New neuroscience report supports Buddhist belief that self is constantly changing

Neuroscientists are discovering what Buddhists have believed for ages: our self is not constant, but ever-changing. A new paper, published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences this month, links the Buddhist belief to physical areas of the brain. There’s scientific evidence that “self-processing in the brain is not instantiated in a particular region or network, but rather extends to a broad range of fluctuating neural processes that do not appear to be self specific,” write the authors. As Even Thompson, a philosophy of mind professor at the University of British Columbia, says, “There’s nothing that corresponds to the sense that there’s an unchanging self.”

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