Food justice requires more than free markets

One in six Americans—residents of the most affluent country on the planet—don’t have enough to eat. And many Black and Latino neighborhoods are often left practically devoid of fresh produce but flooded with fast food restaurants that contribute to high rates of obesity, diabetes and thyroid disease. There’s a relationship between food and health of individual people and the nation. The food justice movement is a loose but expansive conglomeration of organizations working to create a more just food system in the United States. One challenging conclusion from an analysis by Truthout: “The free market has proven time and time again that it is incapable of creating a just food system that can equitably feed the world’s population.”

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Food justice requires more than free markets

One in six Americans—residents of the most affluent country on the planet—don’t have enough to eat. And many Black and Latino neighborhoods are often left practically devoid of fresh produce but flooded with fast food restaurants that contribute to high rates of obesity, diabetes and thyroid disease. There’s a relationship between food and health of individual people and the nation. The food justice movement is a loose but expansive conglomeration of organizations working to create a more just food system in the United States. One challenging conclusion from an analysis by Truthout: “The free market has proven time and time again that it is incapable of creating a just food system that can equitably feed the world’s population.”

Solution News Source

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