MIT scientists aim to bring nuclear fusion energy to the grid within 15 years

The promise of harnessing safe, zero-carbon energy from nuclear fusion may soon become a reality thanks to a newly available superconducting material. The problem thus far with fusion energy is that it only produces net energy at temperatures too hot for any solid material to withstand. With this new superconducting material, the amount of energy needed to get the fusion reaction off the ground is reduced, which can help researchers create a fusion reactor that produces more energy than it took to ignite and contain the process. According to MIT scientists, carbon-free fusion power could be ‘on the grid in 15 years.’

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MIT scientists aim to bring nuclear fusion energy to the grid within 15 years

The promise of harnessing safe, zero-carbon energy from nuclear fusion may soon become a reality thanks to a newly available superconducting material. The problem thus far with fusion energy is that it only produces net energy at temperatures too hot for any solid material to withstand. With this new superconducting material, the amount of energy needed to get the fusion reaction off the ground is reduced, which can help researchers create a fusion reactor that produces more energy than it took to ignite and contain the process. According to MIT scientists, carbon-free fusion power could be ‘on the grid in 15 years.’

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