Facial recognition system can track endangered primates without being invasive

Tracking endangered animals can involve invasive things like fitting primates with GPS tracking devices. That’s why researchers have developed a far-less invasive face detection system that lets field workers keep tabs on chimpanzees, golden monkeys, and lemurs just by snapping a photo of them with an Android app. The facial recognition system is programmed based on thousands of reference photos and can either produce an exact match or five close candidates when field workers take a photo of an endangered primate.

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Facial recognition system can track endangered primates without being invasive

Tracking endangered animals can involve invasive things like fitting primates with GPS tracking devices. That’s why researchers have developed a far-less invasive face detection system that lets field workers keep tabs on chimpanzees, golden monkeys, and lemurs just by snapping a photo of them with an Android app. The facial recognition system is programmed based on thousands of reference photos and can either produce an exact match or five close candidates when field workers take a photo of an endangered primate.

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