New guidelines suggest exercise is crucial for treating cancer

Decades ago, the idea of getting a patient out of bed and moving after a heart attack would be criticized. Today, the benefits of exercise to heart health and recovery are well known. Just like the perception of the ties between exercise and heart health has changed, it seems the same is happening lately with the perception between exercise and cancer.

In October, new guidelines were published that recommends physicians “prescribe” exercise in efforts to reduce the risk of certain cancers and improve the treatment outcomes and quality of life of those with cancer. The gist of the guidance, published in three papers this week, is that exercise can contribute to the prevention of bladder, breast, colon, esophagus, kidney, stomach, and uterine cancer.

The guidelines also state exercise can help improve survival rates for people with breast, colon, and prostate cancer — as well as the quality of life of those people in terms of reducing side effects of cancer treatment. Apparently, exercise is powerful in helping those with cancer because it can help reduce inflammation, help regulate blood sugar and sex hormones while improving metabolism and immune function.

So, how much exercise is actually recommended? According to researchers, people with cancer should do 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity 3 times a week and strength training such as weights 2 to 3 times a week. In terms of cancer prevention, the recommended general physical activity guidelines are at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week.

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New guidelines suggest exercise is crucial for treating cancer

Decades ago, the idea of getting a patient out of bed and moving after a heart attack would be criticized. Today, the benefits of exercise to heart health and recovery are well known. Just like the perception of the ties between exercise and heart health has changed, it seems the same is happening lately with the perception between exercise and cancer.

In October, new guidelines were published that recommends physicians “prescribe” exercise in efforts to reduce the risk of certain cancers and improve the treatment outcomes and quality of life of those with cancer. The gist of the guidance, published in three papers this week, is that exercise can contribute to the prevention of bladder, breast, colon, esophagus, kidney, stomach, and uterine cancer.

The guidelines also state exercise can help improve survival rates for people with breast, colon, and prostate cancer — as well as the quality of life of those people in terms of reducing side effects of cancer treatment. Apparently, exercise is powerful in helping those with cancer because it can help reduce inflammation, help regulate blood sugar and sex hormones while improving metabolism and immune function.

So, how much exercise is actually recommended? According to researchers, people with cancer should do 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity 3 times a week and strength training such as weights 2 to 3 times a week. In terms of cancer prevention, the recommended general physical activity guidelines are at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week.

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