Concrete of the future may be recyclable and even biodegradable

Society has been using concrete to build infrastructure and homes for about 100 years and, throughout its long history, the process has pretty much stayed the same. But it seems concrete is set to get a makeover as the industry attempts to go greener. A few weeks ago we shared how researchers were developing living concrete. In the near future, concrete may be recyclable as well. 

Concrete has a carbon footprint as heavy as the material itself. Its production is responsible for 6 percent of global CO2 emissions. The new concrete was developed by researchers from The University of Tokyo. The product is created using aggregate from old concrete but goes one step further beyond reducing resource consumption and cuts down emissions as well.

The process slashes emissions by adding a resource that doesn’t need to be synthesized: wood. This could even make the substance biodegradable under the right conditions. The new product also has better bending strength than traditional concrete, making it ideal for earthquake-prone areas.

Making one of our most widely used building materials more sustainable is a big step towards achieving greener infrastructure. Hopefully we will see new green concrete in our homes, streets, and offices soon!

 

Solution News Source

Concrete of the future may be recyclable and even biodegradable

Society has been using concrete to build infrastructure and homes for about 100 years and, throughout its long history, the process has pretty much stayed the same. But it seems concrete is set to get a makeover as the industry attempts to go greener. A few weeks ago we shared how researchers were developing living concrete. In the near future, concrete may be recyclable as well. 

Concrete has a carbon footprint as heavy as the material itself. Its production is responsible for 6 percent of global CO2 emissions. The new concrete was developed by researchers from The University of Tokyo. The product is created using aggregate from old concrete but goes one step further beyond reducing resource consumption and cuts down emissions as well.

The process slashes emissions by adding a resource that doesn’t need to be synthesized: wood. This could even make the substance biodegradable under the right conditions. The new product also has better bending strength than traditional concrete, making it ideal for earthquake-prone areas.

Making one of our most widely used building materials more sustainable is a big step towards achieving greener infrastructure. Hopefully we will see new green concrete in our homes, streets, and offices soon!

 

Solution News Source

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