How the Super Bowl tackled food waste this year

The Super Bowl is a day characterized by its food excess. It is the second-largest US food consumption day only surpassed by Thanksgiving with viewers spending on average $82 on food, decor and team apparel. Any spectator walking into the stadium can also witness the plethora of food options and sizes being distributed. 

But once the big show ends, what happens with all the remaining food? Before, it would usually end up in the dumpsters outside of the stadium. But this year was different, with thanks mostly due to the Food Rescue team. The US-based organization was able to rescue around 30,000 pounds of uneaten food, enough to feed around 20,000 people and distribute among five shelters in Florida.

Food wasted in landfills has a huge impact on our climate. When food and other items break down in landfills, they produce methane which has a higher environmental impact than carbon dioxide.

It is worthy to notice that the food rescued was not simple junk food either. ESPN reported that among the food collected one could find beef tenderloins, chicken wings, ribs, charcuterie plates, and other varied snacks. This initiative has ensured that thousands of kilos of meat were saved from going straight into the dumpster.

The big takeaway here is that a change of consciousness is taking place in America. The National Football League, for better or worse, is known to be quite a conservative league that resists change, but this year it has proven itself willing to change for the sake of the planet. While we won’t be satisfied until all sporting events treat food waste in the same manner, it’s good to see America’s biggest sporting event fighting to eliminate food waste.

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How the Super Bowl tackled food waste this year

The Super Bowl is a day characterized by its food excess. It is the second-largest US food consumption day only surpassed by Thanksgiving with viewers spending on average $82 on food, decor and team apparel. Any spectator walking into the stadium can also witness the plethora of food options and sizes being distributed. 

But once the big show ends, what happens with all the remaining food? Before, it would usually end up in the dumpsters outside of the stadium. But this year was different, with thanks mostly due to the Food Rescue team. The US-based organization was able to rescue around 30,000 pounds of uneaten food, enough to feed around 20,000 people and distribute among five shelters in Florida.

Food wasted in landfills has a huge impact on our climate. When food and other items break down in landfills, they produce methane which has a higher environmental impact than carbon dioxide.

It is worthy to notice that the food rescued was not simple junk food either. ESPN reported that among the food collected one could find beef tenderloins, chicken wings, ribs, charcuterie plates, and other varied snacks. This initiative has ensured that thousands of kilos of meat were saved from going straight into the dumpster.

The big takeaway here is that a change of consciousness is taking place in America. The National Football League, for better or worse, is known to be quite a conservative league that resists change, but this year it has proven itself willing to change for the sake of the planet. While we won’t be satisfied until all sporting events treat food waste in the same manner, it’s good to see America’s biggest sporting event fighting to eliminate food waste.

Solution News Source

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