What can we learn from the happiest people in the world

March 20th was the United Nations’ annual International Day of Happiness. And while it may have gone overlooked because of the current coronavirus pandemic, the day serves as a good reminder of the importance of happiness in our lives. But how do we reach the state of being happy during such times of global turmoil? Well, for starters we could learn a thing or two from Finland — for the third time in a row, the country was ranked by the UN’s World Happiness Report the happiest country in the world.

So what makes the Finns so happy? Below we have some compelling lessons — from an actual Finnish person — that anyone around the world can integrate into their own lives during normal times or if you’re staying at home and sheltering in place due to the coronavirus.

Experience the relaxations of the forest on your sofa: The first thing to know is that 70 percent of Finland is covered by forest and the connection with nature is held close to the hearts of the Finnish people. This is an important one because, as research has shown, staying in touch with nature can have wonderful benefits for both your mental and physical health. But even if you can’t get out of the house, you can replicate the experience at home by listening to the relaxing sounds of Finnish Lapland on the Scapes album on Spotify.

Start your day with a cold shower: Another thing to know about these Nordic people is that they love a good winter swim in a lake or the sea, as much as they love the sauna. Immersing your body in cold water changes the way your blood flows, and as the circulation kicks in once your back on dry land, your body warms up and releases the feel-good, mood-balancing hormone serotonin.

Make sense of the world by reading a book: In 2016 the United Nations named Finland the world’s most literate nation, and Finns love books—as well as public libraries. With a population of only 5.5 million people, the Finns borrow close to 68 million books a year. But if you can’t get to a library, no matter. Reading a book at home or online will have the same impact on your mental health and happiness.

Bake a cinnamon bun: Finns are obsessed with a local cinnamon bun treat called korvapuusti, which means “slapped ears” in English. For the Finns, these cinnamon buns are considered the perfect comfort food, and baked at home they infuse a feeling of coziness like nothing else. Pair it with coffee or a glass of milk, and you’ve got yourself settled.

Enjoy art online: Another hallmark of Finland is its rich art scene, which ranges from experimental artist-run initiatives to commercial galleries to flagship art institutions. One place to check out is the new Amos Rex museum, which won the prestigious LCD (Leading Culture Destination) Award for New Cultural Destination of the Year — Europe. You can take a virtual tour of the museum’s new Generation 2020 exhibition in its Instagram Stories.

Or if you feel like taking a cultural trip around the world, thanks to an amazing project from Google, you can now visit some of the world’s best parks, museums, and cultural sites from the comfort of your home.

Solution News Source

What can we learn from the happiest people in the world

March 20th was the United Nations’ annual International Day of Happiness. And while it may have gone overlooked because of the current coronavirus pandemic, the day serves as a good reminder of the importance of happiness in our lives. But how do we reach the state of being happy during such times of global turmoil? Well, for starters we could learn a thing or two from Finland — for the third time in a row, the country was ranked by the UN’s World Happiness Report the happiest country in the world.

So what makes the Finns so happy? Below we have some compelling lessons — from an actual Finnish person — that anyone around the world can integrate into their own lives during normal times or if you’re staying at home and sheltering in place due to the coronavirus.

Experience the relaxations of the forest on your sofa: The first thing to know is that 70 percent of Finland is covered by forest and the connection with nature is held close to the hearts of the Finnish people. This is an important one because, as research has shown, staying in touch with nature can have wonderful benefits for both your mental and physical health. But even if you can’t get out of the house, you can replicate the experience at home by listening to the relaxing sounds of Finnish Lapland on the Scapes album on Spotify.

Start your day with a cold shower: Another thing to know about these Nordic people is that they love a good winter swim in a lake or the sea, as much as they love the sauna. Immersing your body in cold water changes the way your blood flows, and as the circulation kicks in once your back on dry land, your body warms up and releases the feel-good, mood-balancing hormone serotonin.

Make sense of the world by reading a book: In 2016 the United Nations named Finland the world’s most literate nation, and Finns love books—as well as public libraries. With a population of only 5.5 million people, the Finns borrow close to 68 million books a year. But if you can’t get to a library, no matter. Reading a book at home or online will have the same impact on your mental health and happiness.

Bake a cinnamon bun: Finns are obsessed with a local cinnamon bun treat called korvapuusti, which means “slapped ears” in English. For the Finns, these cinnamon buns are considered the perfect comfort food, and baked at home they infuse a feeling of coziness like nothing else. Pair it with coffee or a glass of milk, and you’ve got yourself settled.

Enjoy art online: Another hallmark of Finland is its rich art scene, which ranges from experimental artist-run initiatives to commercial galleries to flagship art institutions. One place to check out is the new Amos Rex museum, which won the prestigious LCD (Leading Culture Destination) Award for New Cultural Destination of the Year — Europe. You can take a virtual tour of the museum’s new Generation 2020 exhibition in its Instagram Stories.

Or if you feel like taking a cultural trip around the world, thanks to an amazing project from Google, you can now visit some of the world’s best parks, museums, and cultural sites from the comfort of your home.

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