US graduates are turning their regalia into PPE to help front-line workers

Virtual graduation ceremonies will be the norm this year, but front-line physician assistant Nathaniel Moore, doesn’t want graduates to let their hard-earned regalia to go to waste — he’s urging recent graduates to wear the cap and donate the gown.

Moore founded a charity called Gowns 4 Good, which offers this year’s grads the possibility to donate their gowns to more than 75,000 front-line respondents in need of personal protective equipment (PPE) who have registered for the regalia on Gowns4Good.net.

Across the country, school graduations have been canceled to abide by social distancing rules, including Moore’s own ceremony at the University of Vermont, where he was earning an MBA with a focus on sustainability.

After researching the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for PPE in times of shortage, he launched the non-profit with the slogan, “Wear the Cap, Donate the Gown.” According to Moore, gowns are worn backward, with the zippered opening in the rear and the high collar in the front, fit the CDC requirements for covering “critical zones,” including forearms, chests, stomach, and waistline.

In keeping with the tradition of graduates decorating their caps to express their individuality, those who donate their gowns are adorning their mortarboards using the Gowns 4 Good logo to draw attention to the cause.

So far, Gowns4Good.net listed more than 75,000 gowns requested by medical facilities, more than 4,100 gowns donated by individuals and more than 1,500 gowns donated by institutional partners, including a regalia manufacturer.

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US graduates are turning their regalia into PPE to help front-line workers

Virtual graduation ceremonies will be the norm this year, but front-line physician assistant Nathaniel Moore, doesn’t want graduates to let their hard-earned regalia to go to waste — he’s urging recent graduates to wear the cap and donate the gown.

Moore founded a charity called Gowns 4 Good, which offers this year’s grads the possibility to donate their gowns to more than 75,000 front-line respondents in need of personal protective equipment (PPE) who have registered for the regalia on Gowns4Good.net.

Across the country, school graduations have been canceled to abide by social distancing rules, including Moore’s own ceremony at the University of Vermont, where he was earning an MBA with a focus on sustainability.

After researching the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for PPE in times of shortage, he launched the non-profit with the slogan, “Wear the Cap, Donate the Gown.” According to Moore, gowns are worn backward, with the zippered opening in the rear and the high collar in the front, fit the CDC requirements for covering “critical zones,” including forearms, chests, stomach, and waistline.

In keeping with the tradition of graduates decorating their caps to express their individuality, those who donate their gowns are adorning their mortarboards using the Gowns 4 Good logo to draw attention to the cause.

So far, Gowns4Good.net listed more than 75,000 gowns requested by medical facilities, more than 4,100 gowns donated by individuals and more than 1,500 gowns donated by institutional partners, including a regalia manufacturer.

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