‘World’s loneliest elephant’ set to leave zoo for a better home

In 2012, an elephant by the name of Kaavan lost his partner at the Marghazar zoo in the Pakistani capital of Islamabad. Ever since then, Kaavan has been without any elephant friends, languishing within a zoo that has been ordered to be closed because of abysmal conditions.

Kaavan’s sad story led him to be dubbed as the “world’s loneliest elephant” by animal activist supporters, who have been advocating for the elephant’s relocation. Fortunately, we have gotten word that the elephant will be allowed to leave his Pakistani zoo and be transferred to better conditions.

According to Martin Bauer, a spokesman for animal rights group Four Paws, the elephant has finally been given medical approval to travel, most likely to Cambodia, where he will find companionship and better conditions.

The examination showed that Kavaan was overweight and showing signs of malnutrition. His nails were also cracked and overgrown from years of living in an unsuitable enclosure with flooring that damaged his feet. His recovery will be a long one, said Bauer, adding that Kaavan’s wounds are more than just physical. He also exhibits behavioral issues.

Nonetheless, with a relocation in the works, it seems a brighter future lies ahead for the “world’s loneliest elephant.”

Solution News Source

‘World’s loneliest elephant’ set to leave zoo for a better home

In 2012, an elephant by the name of Kaavan lost his partner at the Marghazar zoo in the Pakistani capital of Islamabad. Ever since then, Kaavan has been without any elephant friends, languishing within a zoo that has been ordered to be closed because of abysmal conditions.

Kaavan’s sad story led him to be dubbed as the “world’s loneliest elephant” by animal activist supporters, who have been advocating for the elephant’s relocation. Fortunately, we have gotten word that the elephant will be allowed to leave his Pakistani zoo and be transferred to better conditions.

According to Martin Bauer, a spokesman for animal rights group Four Paws, the elephant has finally been given medical approval to travel, most likely to Cambodia, where he will find companionship and better conditions.

The examination showed that Kavaan was overweight and showing signs of malnutrition. His nails were also cracked and overgrown from years of living in an unsuitable enclosure with flooring that damaged his feet. His recovery will be a long one, said Bauer, adding that Kaavan’s wounds are more than just physical. He also exhibits behavioral issues.

Nonetheless, with a relocation in the works, it seems a brighter future lies ahead for the “world’s loneliest elephant.”

Solution News Source

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