This free streaming platform is the Netflix of climate documentaries

Documentary films are some of the best ways to bring across and invite conversations about issues of universal importance. In recent years, this educative type of media has been particularly effective at raising awareness about the current state of our planet. 

Building on this momentum, a number of charities and NGOs around the world have recently joined efforts to launch a Netflix-style streaming platform for environmental and conservation documentaries.

Called WaterBear Network, the streaming service is supported by over 80 global NGOs including WWF, Greenpeace, Amazon Watch, and the Jane Goodall Institute. Currently available in eight countries globally, the platform’s entire content library is free for all to stream and includes Africa’s Hidden Sea Forest, produced by the same team behind Netflix hit My Octopus Teacher.

One of the reasons for launching the platform was to get viewers to engage with the climate crisis. The service’s interactive nature allows people to take action while watching the educative content by choosing to read more about a particular topic or become involved in a charity campaign.

“Every time you watch something, you can choose to do one of six different things,” Ellen Windemuth, WaterBear CEO, explained to Vogue. “It’s about people donating, volunteering in the field, sharing on social media, becoming active themselves. It’s about sharing our world with you.”

To help educate viewers about the world’s most pressing environmental challenges, the WaterBear has structured its content around four key themes: biodiversity, climate, circularity, and community. You can discover the platform’s compelling content yourself and become part of their growing community by registering on their website.

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This free streaming platform is the Netflix of climate documentaries

Documentary films are some of the best ways to bring across and invite conversations about issues of universal importance. In recent years, this educative type of media has been particularly effective at raising awareness about the current state of our planet. 

Building on this momentum, a number of charities and NGOs around the world have recently joined efforts to launch a Netflix-style streaming platform for environmental and conservation documentaries.

Called WaterBear Network, the streaming service is supported by over 80 global NGOs including WWF, Greenpeace, Amazon Watch, and the Jane Goodall Institute. Currently available in eight countries globally, the platform’s entire content library is free for all to stream and includes Africa’s Hidden Sea Forest, produced by the same team behind Netflix hit My Octopus Teacher.

One of the reasons for launching the platform was to get viewers to engage with the climate crisis. The service’s interactive nature allows people to take action while watching the educative content by choosing to read more about a particular topic or become involved in a charity campaign.

“Every time you watch something, you can choose to do one of six different things,” Ellen Windemuth, WaterBear CEO, explained to Vogue. “It’s about people donating, volunteering in the field, sharing on social media, becoming active themselves. It’s about sharing our world with you.”

To help educate viewers about the world’s most pressing environmental challenges, the WaterBear has structured its content around four key themes: biodiversity, climate, circularity, and community. You can discover the platform’s compelling content yourself and become part of their growing community by registering on their website.

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