Science Moms: This group is rallying mothers to become climate activists

As a climate scientist and a mother, Emily Fischer says it can be hard to study climate change because the data feels “very real” to her.  She thinks about our climate timeline in terms of her own kids, knowing that the estimated 10 years or less that we have to perform a massive shift in the way we produce energy is the same amount of time she needs to save and plan to send her daughter to college.

Inspired by her powerful, double-sided perspective on the climate crisis, Fischer teamed up with five other scientists slash moms to create the Science Moms education campaign, which seeks to provide accessible, digestible information about climate change to other mothers in the hopes of inspiring climate action out of them.

“We’re hoping that moms will realize that climate change impacts their children and that we have solutions, but we need to act relatively quickly,” said Fischer.

Although surveys have shown that the overwhelming majority of mothers believe we have a “moral obligation to create a safe and healthy climate for ourselves and our children,” lots of these moms are still insufficiently informed about the issue of how to act.

That’s why Science Moms has been converting overwhelming climate data into “bite-sized nuggets” and spreading it online in an effort to combat any misinformation that mothers may encounter. The Science Moms website also includes resources like books for both moms and kids that address climate change, as well as action steps so moms can reach out to their local representatives. 

According to Fischer, mothers are already accustomed to making decisions for their children’s future. With Science Moms, she hopes mothers will now be more equipped to make smarter choices that will benefit both their kids and the planet.

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Science Moms: This group is rallying mothers to become climate activists

As a climate scientist and a mother, Emily Fischer says it can be hard to study climate change because the data feels “very real” to her.  She thinks about our climate timeline in terms of her own kids, knowing that the estimated 10 years or less that we have to perform a massive shift in the way we produce energy is the same amount of time she needs to save and plan to send her daughter to college.

Inspired by her powerful, double-sided perspective on the climate crisis, Fischer teamed up with five other scientists slash moms to create the Science Moms education campaign, which seeks to provide accessible, digestible information about climate change to other mothers in the hopes of inspiring climate action out of them.

“We’re hoping that moms will realize that climate change impacts their children and that we have solutions, but we need to act relatively quickly,” said Fischer.

Although surveys have shown that the overwhelming majority of mothers believe we have a “moral obligation to create a safe and healthy climate for ourselves and our children,” lots of these moms are still insufficiently informed about the issue of how to act.

That’s why Science Moms has been converting overwhelming climate data into “bite-sized nuggets” and spreading it online in an effort to combat any misinformation that mothers may encounter. The Science Moms website also includes resources like books for both moms and kids that address climate change, as well as action steps so moms can reach out to their local representatives. 

According to Fischer, mothers are already accustomed to making decisions for their children’s future. With Science Moms, she hopes mothers will now be more equipped to make smarter choices that will benefit both their kids and the planet.

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