Water loves Mozart

Japan’s Masaru Emoto demonstrates that sounds, words and even thoughts appear to have an effect on water.

Tijn Touber | November 2003 issue
Water has a memory and is influenced by its environment, contends Japan’s Masaru Emoto in his book ‘The Message From Water’. In the book he describes countless experiments with water. The water is consistently frozen to –5oC so that the effects of the experiments on the ice crystals can be photographed under a microscope. Crystals are fixed substances, in which atoms and molecules are connected through orderly lattice-like structures. The structuring demonstrates, in a way that is visible to the naked eye, the processes that are taking place at an atomic level. Emoto discovered that water crystals show a tendency to crystallise in a methodical fashion into a certain structure. The result of these chemical and energetic changes becomes visible in frozen water.
In his experiments Emoto observed that clean water from mountain streams formed beautiful hexagonal crystals, while polluted water generally formed no crystals at all. Water from areas where diamonds were mined showed diamond-like structures when crystallised. Water from the well in Lourdes looked like a rosary. To ensure that his own researchers’ interpretations did not influence the results the photographs were taken by specialists that did not know where the water came from. Emoto concludes that water works like a kind of fluid tape recorder that absorbs and reflects the environment.
Water also responds to sound. Water placed near soft classical music by Mozart produced a clearer crystal than that placed near hard rock music. What held true for music also appeared to apply to language. Emoto and his team affixed stickers with printed words and sayings onto bottles of distilled water, which they let sit for 24 hours. They started out with Japanese words, then later added English and German. The researchers – some of whom didn’t even know what the German words on the labels meant – discovered that while all three languages corresponded astonishingly well, the words in each language showed remarkable differences.
Emoto explains: ‘You can only understand this if you think in terms of vibration; if you don’t see words as people’s inventions, but as living phenomena. I think sounds point to vibrations in nature. That’s how words came into being. Words evolved from vibrations in nature.’
Again and again the tests produced the same results: water ‘listens’ to words, emotions, thoughts and picks up the vibrations of letters. Love and hate, gratitude and concepts such as ‘soul’, ‘angel’ and ‘devil’ are reflected in the shape of the water crystals. Under controlled circumstances, matching words written in various languages showed nearly identical crystal images.
Meanwhile, Emoto and his colleagues fervently continued with their experiments. Water placed in front of a television showed primarily confused patters, particularly during political debates. Water to which essential oil from a flower was added using electromagnetic vibrations showed the pattern of that particular flower. Water also appeared to be receptive to meditation, prayer and healing energy transmitted from a great distance through the power of thought.
For more information: Masaru Emoto: ‘The Message From Water’ (Hado Publishing, 2002), www.hado.net.
 

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Water loves Mozart

Japan’s Masaru Emoto demonstrates that sounds, words and even thoughts appear to have an effect on water.

Tijn Touber | November 2003 issue
Water has a memory and is influenced by its environment, contends Japan’s Masaru Emoto in his book ‘The Message From Water’. In the book he describes countless experiments with water. The water is consistently frozen to –5oC so that the effects of the experiments on the ice crystals can be photographed under a microscope. Crystals are fixed substances, in which atoms and molecules are connected through orderly lattice-like structures. The structuring demonstrates, in a way that is visible to the naked eye, the processes that are taking place at an atomic level. Emoto discovered that water crystals show a tendency to crystallise in a methodical fashion into a certain structure. The result of these chemical and energetic changes becomes visible in frozen water.
In his experiments Emoto observed that clean water from mountain streams formed beautiful hexagonal crystals, while polluted water generally formed no crystals at all. Water from areas where diamonds were mined showed diamond-like structures when crystallised. Water from the well in Lourdes looked like a rosary. To ensure that his own researchers’ interpretations did not influence the results the photographs were taken by specialists that did not know where the water came from. Emoto concludes that water works like a kind of fluid tape recorder that absorbs and reflects the environment.
Water also responds to sound. Water placed near soft classical music by Mozart produced a clearer crystal than that placed near hard rock music. What held true for music also appeared to apply to language. Emoto and his team affixed stickers with printed words and sayings onto bottles of distilled water, which they let sit for 24 hours. They started out with Japanese words, then later added English and German. The researchers – some of whom didn’t even know what the German words on the labels meant – discovered that while all three languages corresponded astonishingly well, the words in each language showed remarkable differences.
Emoto explains: ‘You can only understand this if you think in terms of vibration; if you don’t see words as people’s inventions, but as living phenomena. I think sounds point to vibrations in nature. That’s how words came into being. Words evolved from vibrations in nature.’
Again and again the tests produced the same results: water ‘listens’ to words, emotions, thoughts and picks up the vibrations of letters. Love and hate, gratitude and concepts such as ‘soul’, ‘angel’ and ‘devil’ are reflected in the shape of the water crystals. Under controlled circumstances, matching words written in various languages showed nearly identical crystal images.
Meanwhile, Emoto and his colleagues fervently continued with their experiments. Water placed in front of a television showed primarily confused patters, particularly during political debates. Water to which essential oil from a flower was added using electromagnetic vibrations showed the pattern of that particular flower. Water also appeared to be receptive to meditation, prayer and healing energy transmitted from a great distance through the power of thought.
For more information: Masaru Emoto: ‘The Message From Water’ (Hado Publishing, 2002), www.hado.net.
 

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