Ginseng and your health

Discovered in the mountains of Manchuria, China, ginseng has been an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Ginseng’s health benefits are extensive but many have yet to be scientifically proven, which may be due to the fact that ginseng’s use predates modern medicine by a few millennia. Regardless of ginseng’s scientific backing, the benefits of regular ginseng consumption are overtly apparent and worth examining.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic recently studied the health benefits of ginseng, particularly in regard to its anti-fatiguing properties and how cancer and post-cancer patients could benefit from its ingestion. Scientists concluded that study participants who took ginseng had a noticeable increase to their energy levels, opposed to study participants who consumed a placebo. Though this study does substantiate ginseng’s long believed ability to reduce fatigue, there are many more reasons to start adding this subterranean supplement to your everyday diet.

From restoring virility to fighting the common cold, the array of health benefits ginseng is accredited for is as extensive as one’s imagination. Ginseng has been shown to boost concentration and learning, and when combined with ginkgo can increase mental performance. An overall improvement in mood and endurance has been seen in those who consume ginseng. As far as ginseng’s benefits in regard to treating illness, it can help those suffering from hepatitis C, heart disease, and high blood pressure.

Ginseng improves your health and can combat a laundry list of ailments, but how does one go about regularly incorporating ginseng into their diet? Since ginseng is a root, the easiest way to take it on a daily basis is in pill form. Ginseng is also available as a dried or peeled root, and as a powder. You can add ginseng root or powder to soups, teas or other drinks. It’s suggested that if taking ginseng as an extract to consume between 100-200 milligrams a day, and if consumed in its root form to take between 500-2000 milligrams a day.

Natural supplements can do amazing things to improve your health. Their understanding and validity often comes under scrutiny from the scientific community, but that doesn’t detract from the real world benefits of natural supplements. Look into other natural roots and herbs to see what they can do for you. Maybe they can replace unnatural supplements you’re currently taking. Next time you feel fatigued try making ginseng tea instead of a cup of coffee. It will wake you up and doesn’t come with the crashing sensation of post caffeine highs.

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Ginseng and your health

Discovered in the mountains of Manchuria, China, ginseng has been an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Ginseng’s health benefits are extensive but many have yet to be scientifically proven, which may be due to the fact that ginseng’s use predates modern medicine by a few millennia. Regardless of ginseng’s scientific backing, the benefits of regular ginseng consumption are overtly apparent and worth examining.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic recently studied the health benefits of ginseng, particularly in regard to its anti-fatiguing properties and how cancer and post-cancer patients could benefit from its ingestion. Scientists concluded that study participants who took ginseng had a noticeable increase to their energy levels, opposed to study participants who consumed a placebo. Though this study does substantiate ginseng’s long believed ability to reduce fatigue, there are many more reasons to start adding this subterranean supplement to your everyday diet.

From restoring virility to fighting the common cold, the array of health benefits ginseng is accredited for is as extensive as one’s imagination. Ginseng has been shown to boost concentration and learning, and when combined with ginkgo can increase mental performance. An overall improvement in mood and endurance has been seen in those who consume ginseng. As far as ginseng’s benefits in regard to treating illness, it can help those suffering from hepatitis C, heart disease, and high blood pressure.

Ginseng improves your health and can combat a laundry list of ailments, but how does one go about regularly incorporating ginseng into their diet? Since ginseng is a root, the easiest way to take it on a daily basis is in pill form. Ginseng is also available as a dried or peeled root, and as a powder. You can add ginseng root or powder to soups, teas or other drinks. It’s suggested that if taking ginseng as an extract to consume between 100-200 milligrams a day, and if consumed in its root form to take between 500-2000 milligrams a day.

Natural supplements can do amazing things to improve your health. Their understanding and validity often comes under scrutiny from the scientific community, but that doesn’t detract from the real world benefits of natural supplements. Look into other natural roots and herbs to see what they can do for you. Maybe they can replace unnatural supplements you’re currently taking. Next time you feel fatigued try making ginseng tea instead of a cup of coffee. It will wake you up and doesn’t come with the crashing sensation of post caffeine highs.

Did you get your free issue of the Intelligent Optimist?  Click here for a free download.

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