Inventors of low-energy LED win Nobel prize

If you remember LED lights from about 10 years ago then you know what they used to look like: Harsh, bright, and fluorescent—unsuitable to be used as a main source of light. Now LED lights produce almost the same color as incandescent bulbs—made possible by the invention of blue LEDs, the last color to be added to the LED spectrum. LEDs also minimize waste, some last up to 10 years or more. The three inventors of blue LED lights have just won the Nobel prize in Physics for their invention of a usable, environmentally conscious and energy efficient source of light. 20 percent of the world’s energy goes to power lighting, optimal adoption of LED lights—made possible by blue LEDs—could reduce energy used for lighting by up to four percent.

Solution News Source

Inventors of low-energy LED win Nobel prize

If you remember LED lights from about 10 years ago then you know what they used to look like: Harsh, bright, and fluorescent—unsuitable to be used as a main source of light. Now LED lights produce almost the same color as incandescent bulbs—made possible by the invention of blue LEDs, the last color to be added to the LED spectrum. LEDs also minimize waste, some last up to 10 years or more. The three inventors of blue LED lights have just won the Nobel prize in Physics for their invention of a usable, environmentally conscious and energy efficient source of light. 20 percent of the world’s energy goes to power lighting, optimal adoption of LED lights—made possible by blue LEDs—could reduce energy used for lighting by up to four percent.

Solution News Source

SIGN UP

TO GET A Free DAILY DOSE OF OPTIMISM

Optimist Subscriber
Delivery Frequency *
reCAPTCHA

We respect your privacy and take protecting it seriously. Privacy Policy