We’re one step closer to producing hydrogen gas in a one-step-process

The biggest question facing the solar power industry today is how do you get solar panels to supply a reliable, steady supply of electricity—even after nightfall or during cloudy days. Batteries are one proposed way, but a team of chemical engineers from the University of California, Berkeley may have found an even better way. The team developed a new, metal-based material that can be used in solar fuel cells to split apart liquid water into steady streams of oxygen and hydrogen gas using nothing more than a gentle influx of sunlight. The hydrogen gas can then be used to keep the power going. Seeing that hydrogen has the highest energy density of any gas, can be stored indefinitely and has no emissions, it would only make sense to produce it with just the help of solar power.

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We’re one step closer to producing hydrogen gas in a one-step-process

The biggest question facing the solar power industry today is how do you get solar panels to supply a reliable, steady supply of electricity—even after nightfall or during cloudy days. Batteries are one proposed way, but a team of chemical engineers from the University of California, Berkeley may have found an even better way. The team developed a new, metal-based material that can be used in solar fuel cells to split apart liquid water into steady streams of oxygen and hydrogen gas using nothing more than a gentle influx of sunlight. The hydrogen gas can then be used to keep the power going. Seeing that hydrogen has the highest energy density of any gas, can be stored indefinitely and has no emissions, it would only make sense to produce it with just the help of solar power.

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