Engineers in Iceland come up with solid way to get rid of CO2 pollution

High up in Iceland’s western volcanic zone, engineers are sequestering carbon dioxide pollution by turning it into rock. Known as the CarbFix project, the engineers dissolve CO2 in water and send it deep beneath the ground where it reacts with basalt rock to become calcite. The engineers claim 95 percent of the gas becomes stone within two years, and that their system can store carbon at prices two to three times cheaper than most storage projects. They’re also keeping their method unpatented so that other countries can adopt similar projects to get rid of pollution.

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Engineers in Iceland come up with solid way to get rid of CO2 pollution

High up in Iceland’s western volcanic zone, engineers are sequestering carbon dioxide pollution by turning it into rock. Known as the CarbFix project, the engineers dissolve CO2 in water and send it deep beneath the ground where it reacts with basalt rock to become calcite. The engineers claim 95 percent of the gas becomes stone within two years, and that their system can store carbon at prices two to three times cheaper than most storage projects. They’re also keeping their method unpatented so that other countries can adopt similar projects to get rid of pollution.

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