Today’s Solutions: August 13, 2022

On an otherwise unadorned table at an event space overlooking Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour, glass bowls displayed the constituent parts of the Impossible Burger. One contained a B-vitamin-laced potato protein paste, another wheat protein, a third a globule of coconut oil. In a fourth, shimmering crimson under the ceiling lights, was the secret sauce: heme (or haem), a component of many proteins, including hemoglobin — the pigment that gives blood its color. It’s also found in the roots of the soybean plant, which is where Impossible Foods extracts it from.

Solutions News Source Print this article
More of Today's Solutions

This composting technique turns food waste into fertilizer in just 24 hours

Composting organic waste is a great way to prevent it from ending up in landfills and releasing methane, a greenhouse gas a lot more potent than CO2. The problem, however, is that in conventional composting ... Read More

How one neighborhood used gamification to reduce traffic emissions

Green transportation methods like walking, biking, and taking public transportation reduces carbon emissions and improve air quality for residents, but encouraging people to choose these options over personal vehicles is a challenge. One neighborhood in ... Read More

Turning waste into musical instruments for disadvantaged youths

In Spain, a creative social project aims to improve the lives of children from disadvantaged backgrounds through music, education, and recycling. The initiative, called Music for Recycling, involves an inventive orchestra that brings together youths ... Read More

This highway was made from recycled diapers

Recycling plastic to create a new purpose for it is nothing new. Here at The Optimist Daily, we’ve previously shared how innovators have reused this material to create blocks for building, a sleek chair, and ... Read More